Try something different

Try something different
Most people are stuck right where they are. The reason they're stuck, however, isn't usually due to circumstances, incompetence, or lack of opportunity, but a simple unwillingness to change, to try new things.
We can make smaller, inner changes on a day-to-day, moment to moment basis – changes in our attitude, reactions, and expectations. I'm talking about being willing to take new risks, and face old fears.
Over and over again I hear people saying things like "I've always done things that way" or "That's just the type of person I am." These things are said as if they are carved in stone. It is amazing what you can learn by simply opening your mind and trying new things.
Starting today, tell yourself that you are going to do something, however small, a little differently. Perhaps you can be more friendly to the people you work with. Maybe it's not too late to overcome your fear of asking others to help you, or for their advice whoever you are, whatever you do, there is always something you can do a little differently.
You may find that you love the tiny changes you make and that you can open exciting new doors by making relatively small adjustments. If you're okay with the changes, you might want to try some other changes as well.

The 7 Laws of Leanness

Why do some people seem naturally thin—able to torch cheeseburgers instantly and never gain a pound? And why do some of us—okay, most of us—sweat and diet and sweat and diet some more, and never lose enough to get the body we want?

Because those "naturally thinking people actually live by a series of laws that keep them from ever gaining weight. And if you know their secrets, you can indulge and enjoy and never gain another pound as long as you live.

As the editor-in-chief of Men's Health, I've spent the past two decades interviewing leading experts, poring over groundbreaking studies, and grilling top athletes, trainers, and celebrities for their health and fitness advice. And I've learned that what separates the fit from the fat, the slim from the sloppy, the toned from the torpid, is a set of rules. And what's amazing is that none of them involves spending hours on a treadmill, eating nothing but grapefruit and tree bark, or having part of the small intestine replaced with fiberfill. Follow these simple rules and weight loss will be automatic.

LAW #1: Lean People Don't Diet
What? Of course lean people diet! They're just magically better at denying themselves than the rest of us are, right?
No. In reality, studies show that the number one predictor of future weight gain is being on a diet right now. Part of the reason is that restricting calories reduces strength, bone density, and muscle mass—and muscle is your body's number-one calorie burner. So by dieting, you're actually setting yourself up to gain more weight than ever. And a recent study in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine showed that tracking your diet in a food journal can actually boost your stress levels, which in turn increases your level of a hormone called cortisol, and cortisol is linked to—you guessed it—weight gain.

FAT-FIGHTING FIBER: Get 25 grams of fiber a day—the amount in about 3 servings of fruits and vegetables—and you can boost fat burn up to 30 percent. For more tips on fighting fat and toning your midsection.

LAW #2: Lean People Don't Go Fat-Free: 
Fat doesn't make you fat, period. Indeed, you need fat in your diet to help you process certain nutrients, like vitamins A, D, and E, for example. And many "fat-free�€� foods are loaded with sugar, and therefore have even more calories than their full-fat cousins. Even the American Heart Association says that fat-free labels lead to higher consumption of unhealthy sweets. Fat keeps you full and satisfied. Fat-free will send you running back to the fridge in an hour, hungry for more.

LAW #3: Lean People Sit Down longer to Eat
In fact, the more you sit down and enjoy your food, the leaner you're going to be. Punishing yourself only makes you fat!

Greek researchers recently reported that eating more slowly and savoring your meal can boost levels of two hormones that make you feel fuller. And researchers at Cornell University found that when people sat down at the table with already full plates of food, they consumed up to 35 percent less than they did when eating family-style—that is, by passing serving dishes around the table.

FIX IT WITH FOOD! Check out our list of the foods that, even in moderation, can strengthen your heart, fortify your bones, and boost your metabolism so you can lose weight more quickly.

LAW #4: Lean People Know What They're Going to Eat Next

Planning your responses to hunger may help you shed pounds faster, say Dutch researchers. They posed their subjects questions like "If you're hungry at 4 p.m., then . . . what?�€� Those who had an answer ("I'll snack on some almonds�€�) were more successful at losing weight than those who didn't have an answer.

One of the best things about the brand-new Eat This, Not That! 2012 is that it helps you find fat-fighting food no matter where you are: movie theater, coffee shop, vending machine. It also includes this list of foods that should never see the inside of your belly: 

LAW #5: Lean People Eat Protein In a recent European study, people who ate moderately high levels of protein were twice as likely to lose weight and keep it off as those who didn't eat much protein.

A New England Journal of Medicine study looked at a variety of eating plans and discovered that eating a diet high in protein and low in refined starches (like white bread) was the most effective for weight loss. Protein works on two levels: First, you burn more calories to digest it. Second, because your body has to work harder to digest a Big Mac than, say, a Ho Ho, you stay fuller longer.

LAW #6: Lean People Move Around
I don't mean climbing Kilimanjaro, breaking the tape at the Boston Marathon, or spending 24 hours at 24 Hour Fitness. I mean going for a short bike ride (20 minutes burns 200 calories), taking a leisurely walk (145 calories every 51 minutes), wrestling with your kids (another 100 calories smoked in 22 minutes), or fishing (there's 150 calories gone in an hour—even more if you actually catch something).

Simply put, fit people stay fit by having fun. Scientists have a name for how you burn calories just enjoying yourself. It's called NEAT: non-exercise activity thermogenesis. Sounds complicated, like something only policy wonks at a global warming summit are qualified to discuss. But it's pretty simple: Pick a few activities that you enjoy, from tossing a stick for your dog to bowling with your best friend, and just do them more often. The average person makes 200 decisions every day that affect his or her weight. If you choose the fun option more often than not, you'll see results.

LAW #7: Lean People Watch Less TV
Instead of calling it the boob tube, maybe we should call it the man-boob tube. About 18 percent of people who watch less than two hours of TV a day have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more—the cutoff line for obesity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But of those who watch more than four hours of TV a day, nearly 30 percent have a BMI that high, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Look, I like TV. But all things in moderation: In a study at the University of Vermont, overweight participants who cut their daily TV time in half (from an average of 5 hours to 2.5 hours) burned an extra 119 calories a day. And a recent study of people who successfully lost weight found that 63 percent of them watched less than 10 hours of TV a week. Want more? A study in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine reported that lean people have an average of 2.6 television sets in their homes. Overweight people have an average of 3.4. Finally, researchers in Australia recently discovered that every hour in front of the television trims 22 minutes from your life. Yikes!

Breaking any of these seven laws occasionally is fine. Just don't make a habit of it.
source: unknown

A chinese Moral Story about pretty lady

Once upon a time a big monk and a little monk were traveling together. They came to the bank of a river and found the bridge was damaged. They had to wade across the river.
There was a pretty lady who was stuck at the damaged bridge and couldn't cross the river.
The big monk offered to carry her across the river on his back to which the lady accepted.
The little monk was shocked by the move of the big monk and was thinking "How can big brother carry a lady when we are supposed to avoid all intimacy with females?" But he kept quiet.
The big monk carried the lady across the river and the small monk followed unhappily. When they crossed the river, the big monk let the lady down and they parted ways with her.
All along the way for several miles, the little monk was very unhappy with the act of the big monk. He was making up all kinds of accusations about big monk in his head. This got him madder and madder. But he still kept quiet. And the big monk had no inclination to explain his situation.
Finally, at a rest point many hours later, the little monk could not stand it any further, he burst out angrily at the big monk. "How can you claim yourself a devout monk, when you seize the first opportunity to touch a female, especially when she is very pretty?"
All your teachings to me make you a big hypocrite.
The big monk looked surprised and said, "I had put down the pretty lady at the river bank many hours ago, how come you are still carrying her along?"
Moral: This very old Chinese Zen story reflects the thinking of many people today. We encounter many unpleasant things in our life, they irritate us and they make us angry. But like the little monk, we are not willing to let them go away.

There is no point in remaining hurt by the unpleasant event after it is over. Learn to move on in life!

Story of Jerry

Jerry is the kind of guy you love to hate. He is always in a good mood
and always has something positive to say. When someone would ask him
how he was doing, he would reply, "If I were any better, I would be
twins!" He was a unique manager because he had several waiters who had
followed him around from restaurant to restaurant.

The reason the waiters followed Jerry was because of his attitude. He
was a natural motivator. If an employee was having a bad day, Jerry
was there telling the employee how to look on the positive side of the

Seeing this style really made me curious, so one day I went up to
Jerry and asked him, I don't get it! You can't be a positive person
all of the time. How do you do it?" Jerry replied, "Each morning I
wake up and say to myself, Jerry, you have two choices today. You can
choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad mood.

I choose to be in a good mood. Each time something bad happens, I can
choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it. I choose to
learn from it. Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can
choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive
side of life. I choose the positive side of life.

"Yeah, right, it's not that easy," I protested. "Yes, it is," Jerry
said. "Life is all about choices. When you cut away all the junk,
every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to situations.
You choose how people will affect your mood. You choose to be in a
good mood or bad mood. The bottom line: It's your choice how you live

I reflected on what Jerry said. Soon thereafter, I left the restaurant
industry to start my own business. We lost touch, but I often thought
about him when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it.

Several years later, I heard that Jerry did something you are never
supposed to do in a restaurant business: he left the back door open
one morning and was held up at gun point by three armed robbers. While
trying to open the safe, his hand, shaking from nervousness, slipped
off the combination. The robbers panicked and shot him. Luckily, Jerry
was found relatively quickly and rushed to the local trauma center.
After 18 hours of surgery and weeks of intensive care, Jerry was
released from the hospital with fragments of the bullets still in his

I saw Jerry about six months after the accident. When I asked him how
he was, he replied, "If I were any better, I'd be twins. Wanna see my
scars?" I declined to see his wounds, but did ask him what had gone
through his mind as the robbery took place. "The first thing that went
through my mind was that I should have locked the back door," Jerry
replied. "Then, as I lay on the floor, I remembered that I had two
choices: I could choose to live or I could choose to die. I chose to

"Weren't you scared? Did you lose consciousness?" I asked. Jerry
continued, "...the paramedics were great. They kept telling me I was
going to be fine. But when they wheeled me into the ER and I saw the
expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses, I got really
scared. In their eyes, I read 'he's a dead man.'

I knew I needed to take action." " What did you do?" I asked. "Well,
there was a big burly nurse shouting questions at me," said Jerry.
"She asked if I was allergic to anything. 'Yes,' I replied. The
doctors and nurses stopped working as they waited for my reply. I took
a deep breath and yelled, 'Bullets!' Over their laughter, I told them,
'I am choosing to live. Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead.'"

Jerry lived thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of
his amazing attitude. I learned from him that every day we have the
choice to live fully. Attitude, after all, is everything.

Positive thinking the the first step towards a happy life

25 best mobile phones ever

25 best mobile phones ever

And the best mobile phones ever, in no particular order, are…

Motorola StarTAC (1996)

The StarTAC wasn't just the first clamshell phone; it was the first cool phone. In the same way that the intrinsic coolness of the iPod fuelled the popularity of MP3 players, so the StarTAC's jazzy design helped establish mobiles as a must-have.
Nokia 1011

Nokia 1011 (1992)

Yes, Motorola set the mobile ball rolling, but Nokia gave it real momentum with this, the first mass-produced GSM phone. It could receive text messages but not send them, and stored 99 numbers – so one each for the number of  people you knew with mobiles and 98 for the rest of your friends.
apple iphone 3g

Apple iPhone 3G (2008)

For all its wow, the original iPhone lacked the speedy on-the-go connectivity to make it truly world-changing. 3G was the fuel that finally launched the iPhone into the smartphone stratosphere.
motorola dynatac 8000x

Motorola DynaTAC 8000x (1983)

This is it – the mother of all mobile phones. Where would we be without the Motorola DynaTAC? Constantly in search of phonebooths and internet cafes, that's where.
nokia n70

Nokia N70 (2005)

For anyone who'd rather tear their own eyeballs out than wrestle with Windows Mobile, the Nokia N70 was the ideal alternative. The speed of 3G combined with the versatility and usability of Symbian 8.1 and the S60 UI resulted in a pocket powerhouse.
sony ericsson w880i

Sony Ericsson W880i (2006)

The W800 may have been Sony Ericsson's first Walkman phone, but the W880i was the first one we coveted. Sleek, brushed-metal and great for playing music, it was a gadgety dream.
motorola razr v3

Motorola RAZR V3 (2004)

Originally intended to be a limited-edition premium phone, the RAZR's demand became so great that eventually everybody had one, in one of the zillion colours it got released in while Moto milked its success. The phone itself was a pain to use, but boy was it a lovely object.
sony ericsson t610

Sony Ericsson T610 (2003)

One of our all-time favourite candybar mobiles, the T610 was tiny yet classy. Despite its teensiness, it crammed in a camera and Bluetooth, while the nub-like joystick was great for games.
nokia 8110

Nokia 8110 (1996)

Yes, it's the Matrix phone. After we'd watched Neo purposefully pop the slide down on his 8110, we all wanted one. Shame the spring-loaded slider was a custom addition to Keanu's and we had to wait for the later 7110 before we could get a similar push-button slide action. Still, the 8110 looked far cooler.
nokia n95

Nokia N95 (2007)

GPS, a 5MP camera, dual-sliding form factor, HSDPA and expandable storage via a MicroSD slot all added up to make a formidable device. If it weren't for that dastardly iPhone redefining the smartphone genre, the Nokia N95 may have reigned supreme for years.
htc hero

HTC Hero (2009)

It wasn't the first Android phone – that honour lies with the T-Mobile G1 – but the HTC Hero was the first to seem a real threat to the iPhone's dominance. And that kick-out chin gave it some personality that's largely been lacking in other Android handsets, even if it did draw comments about Jimmy Hill.
blackberry 7230

BlackBerry 7230 (2003)

The so-called BlueBerry (any guesses why?) was the first colour-screened BlackBerry and the breakthrough that led to the CrackBerry addiction. Email was never to be a purely deskbound pursuit again.
nokia 9300

Nokia 9300 (2005)

Sure the iPhone generation might laugh now, but those of us who used Nokia Communicators still yearn for a natural successor. It was as if someone had wedged a Psion organiser on the back of a dependable Nokia business mobile – and we mean that in a very good way. The 9300 may have been a cut-price 9500, but the reduced size also gave it the edge.
samsung galaxy s ii

Samsung Galaxy S II (2011)

The best Android phone yet, with a simply amazing AMOLED screen and plenty of grunt. Make no mistake, if the Android Market were as good as the App Store, this would be the one handset to rule them all.
sony ericsson p800

Sony Ericsson P800 (2002)

A mammoth smartphone, the P800 had a massive touchscreen as well as a traditional number pad that flipped across part of the screen. It was a giant among smarties, but also an impressive widescreen gaming handheld. Shame the subsequent P900 and P910 didn't slim down to keep the P-series from sinking under the weight of their own blubber.
samsung x820

Samsung SGH-X820 (2006)

We still thought Christopher Biggins was just big boned before the X820 came along and redefined skinny. Every other handset suddenly seemed like a bloater on a diet of heavy batteries and surplus plastic.
nokia 6300

Nokia 6300 (2007)

If anyone needed a reminder of how well Nokia made basic, anyone-can-use-it mobiles, the 6300 was the perfect example of the simple-phone art. Stylish, solid and superb.
blackberry bold 9000

BlackBerry Bold 9000 (2008)

The 9000 was the ultimate evolution of the original BlackBerry, before they got all touchscreeny. The addition of 3G and a 2MP camera made it more friendly and less businessy.
nokia 3210

Nokia 3210 (1999)

It was a toss-up between this and the 3310, but this mini gem left more of a lasting impression – and isn't tainted by the memory of a million tacky Xpress-on covers. This was the phone that really brought Snake and T9 predictive texting to the masses.
o2 xda ii mini

O2 XDA II Mini (2005)

Also known as the i-mate JAM, this was one of HTC's finest Windows Mobile devices and an awe-inspiring exercise in miniaturisation.
sony ericsson k800i

Sony Ericsson K800i (2006)

Before this Cyber-shot mobile winked its shutter at us, we didn't take camera-phones that seriously. Sure they were okay for silly snaps, but you wouldn't capture important memories on them. A 3.2MP sensor, sliding lens cover and proper Xenon flash meant this was as much camera as phone.
orange spv c500

Orange SPV C500 (2004)

Also known as the HTC Typhoon and T-Mobile SDA, among other things. This WinMob smartphone was the Nokia N95 of its day, offering so much power that it gained the admiration of geeks everywhere.
nokia 6310i

Nokia 6310i (2002)

The 6310i wasn't about features or wow; it was the paramount business phone because it was super-reliable and had a battery that needed charging less frequently than new series of Big Brother would roll round.
sony cmd-z5

Sony CMD-Z5 (2000)

Before Sony joined forces with Ericsson, it was already making some of the tastiest handsets around. This ickle flipper was the best of them, and featured a handy side-mounted jog dial for scrolling menus and, more importantly, playing the built-in fishing game.
t-mobile sidekick ii

T-Mobile Sidekick 2 (2004)

BlackBerry might be the king of mobile email, but for a time the Sidekick was the queen. Also known by the ridiculous moniker of Danger Hiptop2, the Sidekick 2 relied on cloud data storage and became popular for its excellent Qwerty keypad and easily scrollable messages. Paris Hilton's Sidekick 2 famously had its address book hacked, and problems with the cloud service doomed later models.


Mouth Problems in Infants and Children


Mouth Problems in Infants and Children

See complete list of charts.

Sores and other problems in and around your child's mouth can be painful and worrisome. Follow this chart for more information about common causes of mouth problems in children.

Note: Aspirin should never be used in the treatment of chickenpox, influenza, or other viral diseases because aspirin has been associated with the serious disease Reye syndrome, which can lead to liver failure and even death. In general, aspirin should not be used for children or teenagers except on the advice of a doctor for certain conditions.




Toilet Training Your Child

Toilet Training Your Child

When should I start toilet training my child?

Do not start toilet training until both you and your child are ready. You are ready when you are able to devote the time and energy necessary to encourage your child on a daily.

Signs that your child is ready include the following:

  • Your child signals that his or her diaper is wet or soiled.
  • Your child seems interested in the potty chair or toilet.
  • Your child says that he or she would like to go to the potty.
  • Your child understands and follows basic instructions.
  • Your child feels uncomfortable if his or her diaper is wet or soiled.
  • Your child stays dry for periods of 2 hours or longer during the day.
  • Your child wakes up from naps with a dry diaper.
  • Your child can pull his or her pants down and then up again.

You may start noticing these signs when your child is 18 to 24 months of age. However, it is not uncommon for a child to still be in diapers at 2 and a half to 3 years of age.

Return to top

How should I prepare my child for toilet training?

Allow your child to be present when you go to the bathroom and make your child feel comfortable in the bathroom. Allow your child to see urine and bowel movements in the toilet. Let your child practice flushing the toilet.

Before toilet training your child, place a potty chair in your child's normal living and play area so that your child will become familiar with the potty. Consider placing a potty chair on each floor of the house if you live in a multilevel home. Allow your child to observe, touch and become familiar with the potty chair.

Tell your child that the potty chair is his or her own chair. Allow your child to sit fully clothed on the potty chair, as if it were a regular chair. Allow your child to leave the potty chair at any time. Do not force your child to spend time sitting on the chair.

After your child has become used to the potty chair and sits on it regularly with his or her clothes on, try having your child sit on the potty without wearing pants and a diaper. Let your child become comfortable with sitting on the potty without wearing pants and a diaper.

The next step is to show your child how the potty chair is used. Place stool from a dirty diaper into the potty chair. Allow your child to observe the transfer of the bowel movement from the potty chair into the toilet. Let your child flush the toilet and watch the bowel movement disappear down the toilet.

Return to top

How do I teach my child to use the toilet?

After your child has become comfortable with flushing the toilet and sitting on the potty chair, you may begin teaching your child to go to the bathroom. Keep your child in loose, easily removable pants.

Place your child on the potty chair whenever he or she signals the need to go to the bathroom. Your child's facial expression may change when he or she feels the need to urinate or to have a bowel movement. Your child may stop any activity he or she is engaged in when he or she feels the need to go to the bathroom.

Most children have a bowel movement once a day, usually within an hour after eating. Most children urinate within an hour after having a large drink.

In addition to watching for signals that your child needs to urinate or have a bowel movement, place your child on the potty at regular intervals. This may be as often as every 1 and a half to 2 hours.

Stay with your child when he or she is on the potty chair. Reading or talking to your child when he or she is sitting on the potty may help your child relax. Praise your child when he or she goes to the bathroom in the potty chair, but do not express disappointment if your child does not urinate or have a bowel movement in the potty. Be patient with your child.

Once your child has learned to use the potty chair, your child can begin using an over-the-toilet seat and a step-up stool.

Return to top

What about training pants?

Doctors disagree about whether to use disposable training pants. Some think that training pants may confuse children and make them think it is okay to use them like diapers. This may slow the toilet training process. Others think training pants may be a helpful step when you are training your child. Sometimes, training pants are used at nighttime, when it is more difficult for a child to control his or her bladder.

Return to top

What if my child has an accident?

Your child may have an occasional accident even after he or she learns how to use the toilet. Sometimes, children get too involved in activities and forget that they need to use the bathroom. Suggesting regular trips to the bathroom may help prevent some accidents.

If your child does have an accident, stay calm. Do not punish your child. Simply change your child and continue to encourage your child to use the potty chair.

Return to top

How long will it take to toilet train my child?

Every child is different. It may take as long as 3 to 6 months for your child to be toilet trained during daytime. It may take longer to teach your child to use the toilet during nighttime when his or her bladder control is reduced. It is important for you to be patient and supportive. If after a few months, your child is still resisting or having difficulties with toilet training, talk to your family doctor. The most likely reason your child has not learned to use the potty is that your child is not yet ready for toilet training.