Blog Archive

8 Things Remarkably Successful People Do

I'm fortunate to know a number of remarkably successful people. I've described how these people share a set of specific perspectives and beliefs.
They also share a number of habits:
1. They don't create back-up plans.
Back-up plans can help you sleep easier at night. Back-up plans can also create an easy out when times get tough.
You'll work a lot harder and a lot longer if your primary plan simply has to work because there is no other option. Total commitment--without a safety net--will spur you to work harder than you ever imagined possible.
If somehow the worst does happen (and the "worst" is never as bad as you think) trust that you will find a way to rebound. As long as you keep working hard and keep learning from your mistakes, you always will.
2. They do the work...
You can be good with a little effort. You can be really good with a little more effort.
But you can't be great--at anything--unless you put in an incredible amount of focused effort.
Scratch the surface of any person with rare skills and you'll find a person who has put thousands of hours of effort into developing those skills.
There are no shortcuts. There are no overnight successes. Everyone has heard about the 10,000 hours principle but no one follows it... except remarkably successful people.
So start doing the work now. Time is wasting.
3.  ...and they work a lot more.
Forget the Sheryl Sandberg "I leave every day at 5:30" stories. I'm sure she does. But she's not you.
Every extremely successful entrepreneur I know (personally) works more hours than the average person--a lot more. They have long lists of things they want to get done. So they have to put in lots of time.
Better yet, they want to put in lots of time.
If you don't embrace a workload others would consider crazy then your goal doesn't mean that much to you--or it's not particularly difficult to achieve. Either way you won't be remarkably successful.
4. They avoid the crowds.
Conventional wisdom yields conventional results. Joining the crowd--no matter how trendy the crowd or "hot" the opportunity--is a recipe for mediocrity.
Remarkably successful people habitually do what other people won't do. They go where others won't go because there's a lot less competition and a much greater chance for success.
5. They start at the end...
Average success is often based on setting average goals.
Decide what you really want: to be the best, the fastest, the cheapest, the biggest, whatever. Aim for the ultimate. Decide where you want to end up. That is your goal.
Then you can work backwards and lay out every step along the way.
Never start small where goals are concerned. You'll make better decisions--and find it much easier to work a lot harder--when your ultimate goal is ultimate success.
6. ... and they don't stop there.
Achieving a goal--no matter how huge--isn't the finish line for highly successful people. Achieving one huge goal just creates a launching pad for achieving another huge goal.
Maybe you want to create a $100 million business; once you do you can leverage your contacts and influence to create a charitable foundation for a cause you believe in. Then your business and humanitarian success can create a platform for speaking, writing, and thought leadership. Then...
The process of becoming remarkably successful in one field will give you the skills and network to be remarkably successful in many other fields.
Remarkably successful people don't try to win just one race. They expect and plan to win a number of subsequent races.
7. They sell.
I once asked a number of business owners and CEOs to name the one skill they felt contributed the most to their success. Each said the ability to sell.
Keep in mind selling isn't manipulating, pressuring, or cajoling. Selling is explaining the logic and benefits of a decision or position. Selling is convincing other people to work with you. Selling is overcoming objections and roadblocks.
Selling is the foundation of business and personal success: knowing how to negotiate, to deal with "no," to maintain confidence and self-esteem in the face of rejection, to communicate effectively with a wide range of people, to build long-term relationships...
When you truly believe in your idea, or your company, or yourself then you don't need to have a huge ego or a huge personality. You don't need to "sell."
You just need to communicate.
8. They are never too proud.
To admit they made a mistake. To say they are sorry. To have big dreams. To admit they owe their success to others. To poke fun at themselves. To ask for help.
To fail.
And to try again.
Jeff Haden learned much of what he knows about business and technology as he worked his way up in the manufacturing industry. Everything else he picks up from ghostwriting books for some of the smartest leaders he knows in business. @jeff_haden




M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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The Truth About Multitasking: How Your Brain Processes Information

It's the gospel of productivity in a maxed-out world: Multitasking helps you get more done faster.

"When you perform multiple tasks that each require some of the same channels of processing, conflicts will arise between the tasks, and you're going to have to pick and choose which task you're going to focus on and devote a channel of processing to it," he explains.

Meyer has been at the forefront of research for several decades on how the brain processes information and copes with multitasking. He has investigated the brain's speed, accuracy and memory in information processing while working with psychologist David Kieras for the Office of Naval Research. A study Meyer co-wrote on the limitations of multitasking ("Executive Control of Cognitive Processes in Task Switching") went viral in 2001, setting off the first awareness of the counterproductivity of simultaneous activities.

Meyer's work has helped demonstrate that humans have distinct bandwidth challenges, which can make multitasking problematic. It turns out the brain's ability to process information is limited in a variety of ways -- from processing channels to limits on data volume, velocity and working memory -- that confound true, simultaneous task actions.

Counter to common belief, you can't do two cognitively complicated tasks at once, Meyer says. When you're on the phone and writing an e-mail at the same time, you're actually switching back and forth between them, since there's only one mental and neural channel through which language flows. "If you have a complicated task, it requires all your attention, and if you're trying to spread your attention over multiple tasks, it's not going to work," he says.

That's heresy in a time-urgent world with the attention span of a macaque on crack. Meyer admits that multitasking is not only getting more prevalent, but it's also "very often highly inefficient and can be dangerous to your health." Even the most adept multitasker will "crash and burn" trying to resolve simultaneous conflicting demands, Meyer says. That means you could wind up sending the wrong e-mail; blow an account; have a "brownout," in which too much access to the cerebral grid shuts down critical thinking; or worse, find yourself in a truly hazardous situation, such as driving while using a cell phone.

"When you're driving, you have to use the language channel to talk, read signs, plan your next move. If you're trying to have a cell phone conversation while you're doing that, either the phone conversation will suffer or the driving," Meyer says.

He points to the growing number of auto accidents caused by businesspeople sending work texts from behind the wheel. The conflicts triggered by incessant multitasking can set off chronic stress and slow you down, shredding productivity. In fact, trying to complete two or more tasks at once can take 50 percent more time or longer, depending on the complexity of the tasks, Meyer says.

The good news is that there is hope for the attention-span-challenged, in the form of self-regulation through better time management and scheduling. "If you're disciplined enough, you can map out the usage of your time in a way that minimizes your exposure to interruptions," Meyer explains.

Entrepreneurs are some of the most compulsive multitaskers--"macho master multitaskers," as Meyer puts it -- but he says you'd be wise to cool the scatterbrain jets and focus.

"If you want to be a creative entrepreneur, you ought to be setting aside large chunks of time where you just think," he says. "Einstein was not multitasking when he was dreaming up the special and general theories of relativity."

Read more stories about: Productivity, Multitasking, Thought Leaders

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/224943

 
M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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Story: Cute Student counts apples

A teacher teaching Maths to seven-year-old Laiq asked him, "If I give you one apple and one apple and one apple, how many apples will you have?"Within a few seconds Laiq replied confidently, "Four!"
The dismayed teacher was expecting an effortless correct answer (three).  She was disappointed.  "Maybe the child did not listen properly," she thought.  She repeated, "Laiq, listen carefully.  If I give you one apple and one apple and one apple, how many apples will you have?"
Laiq had seen the disappointment on his teacher's face.  He calculated again on his fingers.  But within him he was also searching for the answer that will make the teacher happy.  His search for the answer was not for the correct one, but the one that will make his teacher happy.  This time hesitatingly he replied, "Four…"
The disappointment stayed on the teacher's face.  She remembered that Laiq liked strawberries.  She thought maybe he doesn't like apples and that is making him loose focus.  This time with an exaggerated excitement and twinkling in her eyes she asked, "If I give you one strawberry and one strawberry and one strawberry, then how many you will have?"
Seeing the teacher happy, young Laiq calculated on his fingers again.  There was no pressure on him, but a little on the teacher.  She wanted her new approach to succeed.  With a hesitating smile young Laiq enquired, "Three?"
The teacher now had a victorious smile.  Her approach had succeeded.  She wanted to congratulate herself.  But one last thing remained.  Once again she asked him, "Now if I give you one apple and one apple and one more apple how many will you have?"
Promptly Laiq answered, "Four!"
The teacher was aghast.  "How Laiq, how?" she demanded in a little stern and irritated voice.
In a voice that was low and hesitating young Laiq replied, "Because I already have one apple in my bag."
"When someone gives you an answer that is different from what you expect don't think they are wrong.  There maybe an angle that you have not understood at all. You will have to listen and understand, but never listen with a predetermined notion."

 
M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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Story: Mistake of senior executive

When John D Rockefeller ran the Standard Oil Company one of his senior executives made a mistake that cost over $2 million.
The other executives thought Rockefeller would come down heavy on him and probably fire him.  But he didn't.  Before he called the man in,
he sat down, took a notepad and wrote across the top of it: 'Points in favour of this man'.  Then he listed the man's strengths, including how he'd once helped the company make the right decision and earn them millions of dollars.  
One of the senior executives who witnessed it later said, 'Whenever I am tempted to rip into someone, I force myself to sit down and compile a list of the good qualities they have.  By the time I have finished, I have the right perspective.  And best of all, my anger is under control.  I can't tell you how many times this habit has prevented me from committing one of life's costliest mistakes-losing my temper.  I recommend it to anyone who must deal with people.  
So before you jump to conclusions about someone, stop and ask God for wisdom, then sit down and make a list of their best qualities.  If you do you may come to a different conclusion.  One thing is for sure, you'll approach them with the right attitude and you won't say things you'll later regret

 
M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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The Powerful Vitamin F :)


Why do I have a variety of friends who are all so different in  character?  How can I get along with them all?  I think that each one helps to bring out a "different" part of me.
With one of them I am polite.  I joke with another friend. I sit down and talk about serious matters with one.  With another I laugh a lot.    I listen to one friend's  problems.  Then I listen to another one's advice for me.

My friends are all like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle.  When completed,  they form a treasure box.  A treasure of friends!  They are my friends  who understand me better than myself, who support me through good days  and bad days.  We all pray together and for each other.

 Real Age doctors tell us that friends are good for our health.  Dr. Oz  calls them Vitamins F (for Friends) and counts the benefits of friends  as essential to our well being. Research shows that people in strong  social circles have less risk of depression and terminal strokes. If  you enjoy Vitamins F constantly you can be up to 30 years younger than your real age.  The warmth of friendship stops stress and even in your most intense moments it decreases the chance of a cardiac arrest or stroke by 50%. I'm so happy that I have a stock of Vitamins F!

In summary, we should value our friends and keep in touch with them. We should try to see the funny side of things and laugh together, and pray for each other in the tough moments. 

Thank you for being one of my Vitamins
M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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7 steps to great relationships



1. Respect People
Always talk to people with respect; speaking to them like you want to be spoken to. Be kind in your words and actions. Think before you speak, because once the words leave your mouth, they can't ever be taken back. Your words may be forgiven, but they will never be forgotten. When you speak harshly to someone, you put a small crack in that relationship. Too many small cracks and the relationship will crumble.

2. Be Loyal and Trustworthy
Be the kind of person that can always be counted on to do the right thing. Never do anything to betray that trust. Always be honest, and always temper your honesty with kindness. Let them know that they can always lean on you, and even their deepest secrets are safe. If you don't have trust in a relationship, you don't have anything to build on.
"A friend is one who walks in when others walk out" ~~ Walter Winchell

3. Put Others First – Be a Friend
I know it's not easy, but you need to put the needs of others first. By that very act you show how much you care, and how important that relationship is to you. When you enter a relationship with a heart that puts others first, you are blessed by the fruits that are grown from such an act. By showing a genuine interest in others, you show yourself a friend, and gain loyal, lifelong friends to yourself.
As Dale Carnegie said, "You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.
"The only reward of virtue is virtue; the only way to have a friend is to be one." ~~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

4. Don't Try and Be Someone You're not
Always strive to be your best self, but never try and be someone you're not. Relationships built upon lies and distortions will never stand. Real friends are honest and upfront with each other. If you want to have a real friend, then be a real friend. Part of being a real friend is being yourself. If you want to impress someone, impress them with your kindness and friendship.

5. Don't Take People For Granted
I think this act probably causes more hurt, resentment, or weakening of friendships than any other. We go from enjoying someone's company, really appreciating all the things they do for us, and thinking about how great they are for the things they do. Then, let a little time go by, and we stop acknowledging the good things about them. We come to expect certain things that we considered special at one time. Don't do it, it's a relationship breaker. No one wants to be taken for granted.

6. Be Forgiving
What if the one being taken for granted is you? It hurts to feel like you're not appreciated. If we aren't vigilant in caring for our relationships, these things can easily happen. That's why it is important for us to look at others like Christ looks at us, with compassion and forgiveness.
Be sure to talk to the person taking you for granted. Don't let it build inside until the relationship is destroyed and irreparable. If they're a true friend they should apologize and be willing to change that.
Another trick to great relationships is good communications, and not holding grudges. Be forgiving as Christ is forgiving.

7. Be Positive and Encouraging
I love being around people who are positive and encouraging. It brings out the best in me and causes me to want to be positive and encourage to others. Can you think of a better emotional boost than to help put a smile on someone's face?
Dwelling on and being discouraged over problems will do nothing to make them better. We need to acknowledge the problem, tell that problem it's not going to define us, and then get to working finding a solution.
When someone you care about is down and hurting, you getting depressed with them will do nothing to help. What you need to do is show them compassion, be empathetic, and let them know you're there for them.
Then you need to lift them up. Help them to see some of the wonderful things about themselves and their life. Sometimes people just need to be reminded that they're special, and we believe in them even when they quit believing in themselves. 

M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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7 Steps for Successful Speaking On The Spot


by Darlene Price, author of Well Said: Presentations and Conversations that Get Results

To get ahead, you need to be able to speak confidently when you're put on the spot. Here are seven steps to follow so you keep your composure and respond well when you're under pressure.
"So, Karen, you're recommending that we migrate our current systems to a brand new platform? How do you plan on avoiding the disaster that happened with our Detroit division who tried this two years ago? Surely you're not recommending we do the same thing."
If you're Karen, you've just been put on the spot. You have to answer the question clearly, confidently and concisely so that you dispel the CEO's concerns and gain approval on your proposal. What do you say? How do you say it? What if your mind goes blank?
Mastering the art of thinking on your feet is an essential career-building skill. Not only does it reveal how confident, credible and composed you are, it ensures your ideas are heard and acted upon.
Whether you're answering Q&A after a presentation, responding to your boss in a meeting, or interviewing with the press, you don't have to 'sweat it' when you're in the hot seat. Try these seven steps for successful speaking on the spot.
1. Relax.
You want your voice to sound confident and your brain to think clearly, so you have to be as relaxed as possible. This is of course is the opposite of how you are feeling so you must intentionally take steps to 'manufacture' relaxing affects. Take a few slow deep breaths – this relaxes the body and the mind. Be sure to avoid a pensive scowl or furrowed brow by consciously keeping your facial expressions neutral to positive.  Silently affirm yourself by thinking, "I can do this." "I'm confident and in control." "I'm the expert on this subject." Remember, your audience can only see how you look and act on the outside; they never see how you feel on the inside.
2. Listen.
Often when we are in a high pressure situation and the adrenalin is pumping, we don't stop to hear the actual question or concern of the speaker due to the static in our own minds. To make sure we understand the question and give the appropriate answer, focus intently on the other person.  Look at him or her directly in the eyes. Hear exactly what is being spoken. Observe the speaker's body language.  This shows attentiveness, prevents distraction and increases comprehension. Try to interpret what is being said 'between the lines.' Is this a legitimate objection or an attack? Is it a simple request for more information or a test? Why is this person asking this question and what is it they really want? 
3. Repeat the question, if appropriate.
Especially in a large meeting or public setting, restate the question loudly enough for everyone to hear. This gives the questioner the opportunity to clarify the question, or more clearly articulate it the second time. In the process, you gain more time to think and formulate your answer. Also, restating allows you to take control of the question and re-phrase or neutralize it if needed.
4. Ask a clarifying question.
If the question is too broad and you want to narrow the focus before you can effectively answer, ask them a question first before you respond. This ensures you reply with a more meaningful helpful answer, plus it shows you care and are listening. For example, in the above scenario, Karen could have asked, "Which aspects of the Detroit migration concern you the most about this project?"
5. Pause and Think.
Silence, used appropriately, communicates you are in charge of the situation and comfortable in the setting. When you pause you look and sound poised and confident. Avoid the temptation to answer too quickly – even though you may have the perfect reply.  This often results in speaking too fast and saying too much. A well-timed pause to collect your thoughts tells your brain to slow down. It also helps you organize and prioritize the content of your answer.
6. Use an organized structure.
In addition to anxiety, another key reason we freeze or go blank when placed on the spot is because so many ideas begin to stream through our minds at once. Avoid verbalizing that stream of consciousness (also known as rambling, or winging it). Remember, the questioner does not want or expect you to give a speech on the subject. What they do want is a clear concise answer with just enough supporting information to satisfy their concern. This requires on-the-spot structure. Limit yourself to two, no more than three key points with a statement of evidence under each. For example, here's how Karen could have responded to her CEO:
"Yes, Bob, I do recommend we migrate our current systems to the new platform. There are three main reasons why this transition will successfully avoid your Detroit concerns: First, the new platform features 99% defect free software…" (give one or two statements of supporting evidence).
"Second, it integrates seamlessly with all our systems…
And third, our migration strategy ensures no downtime for our customers…"
By focusing on two or three main points, and giving just the right amount of supporting evidence, you sound confident, clear and concise.
7. Summarize and Stop.
Conclude your response with a quick summary statement and stop. Most likely, a brief period of silence will follow as listeners are absorbing your message. Resist the common error of filling this silence with more information. If you ramble on with more details, you may end up causing confusion, belaboring the point, or opening up a can of worms. Here's how Karen could have summarized:  "So Bob, in summary, I do hear and appreciate your concerns; however, my team and I have thoroughly reviewed the challenges of the Detroit migration, and we're confident the plan for our division will succeed. With the new bug-free software, seamless integration, and customer uptime, our strategy will deliver all the benefits outlined in the proposal and ensure the success of our company and customers."
Thinking on your feet means staying in control of the situation. Remember to relax your body and breathe deeply. Listen actively to the questioner. Repeat their question if necessary, and ask them a question if necessary to narrow the focus. Use the reflective pause to aid clear calm thinking. Then, when you're ready to speak on the spot, be sure to apply a solid structure – limit your answer to three key points with brief supporting evidence under each. Summarize your points and stop. By practicing these simple steps, you will come across as a confident, credible, and trustworthy expert who knows how to think on her feet and speak on the spot.
Darlene Price is the president and cofounder of Well Said!, Inc., a training and consulting company specializing in high-impact presentations and effective communication. She has coached thousands of executives and professionals at companies such as AT&T, IBM, Macy's, Microsoft, Motorola, UPS, and Xerox, among others and is the author of Well Said: Presentations and Conversations that Get Results. www.wellsaid.com


ASUS: World’s First Dual-Screen Ultrabook

 

 

You haven't seen a Windows 8 hybrid like this. The ASUS Taichi makes it ridiculously easy to go from laptop to tablet mode. Just close the lid on this 11.6-inch Ultrabook and you'll find a second full HD screen with touch sitting right on the outside. It's definitely wild, and we couldn't wait to unbox one of the most unique laptops ever to share our initial impressions. 

Not only can you use the Taichi as either a tablet or a traditional clamshell, but you can use both screens at the same time. That can be useful when you want to give a presentation, but don't want to keep turning the notebook around. Before we get to the pretty pictures, lets talk about the specs and features you get for your $1,299.

Specifications

  • Intel Core i5-3317U 1.7GHz Processor
  • 3MB Cache
  • 4GB DDR3 Memory
  • 128GB Solid state Drive (SSD)
  • 11.6″ IPS Full HD Dual LED-backlit TFT LCD Display (1920 x 1080, 16:9)
  • Intel HD Graphics 4000
  • Wi-Fi 802.11a/b/g/n WLAN
  • Bluetooth V4.0
  • 10/100 MBps Ethernet LAN
  • Integrated HD + 5MP Dual Cameras (720p Video recording) & Array Microphone
  • Integrated Speaker with Sonic Master & Bang & Olufsen ICEPower
  • Illuminated Chicklet Keyboard
  • Connections: 2 x USB 3.0, Headphone-out & Audio-in Combo Jack, micro HDMI, mini VGA, 1 x Screen A Lock Bottom
  • Approximate Dimensions (WxDxH): 12.05 x 7.83 x 0.19 ~ 0.69 inches / 30.6 x 19.9 x 0.47 ~ 1.74 cm
  • Approximate Unit Weight: 2.8 pounds / 1.25 kg

The Taichi comes in an elegant matte black box, not unlike those we've seen from other premium notebooks. On the lid is printed ASUS TAICHI in black glossy ink. 

Upon opening the box, the first thing on top is perhaps the most curious thing included,  the ASUS Taichi Prestige Card. It comes in a small paper holder with the following statement:

Dear valued customers,

By choosing ASUS TAICHI and opening this box, you are embarking on a wonderful journey that will take you on an adventure in search of incredible. TAICHI embodies a fusion of advanced technology, meticulous craftsmanship, and thoughtful design. It represents our eforts to give you the means to go beyond the ordinary and explore new frontiers of experience and imagination. We are delighted that you made the decision to join us on this path, and are certain you will find TAICHI an enabler of many incredible moments.

With many thanks and best wishes,

Jerry Shen, ASUS CEO

On the back of the plastic Prestige Card is printed the following:

ASUS Taichi Exclusive Service

  • Complimentary intrastate  pick up and return service (ed. note: Do they mean "interstate"?)
  • Priority service hotline
  • 20% off for service charge (for hardware material cost of out-of warranty or exclusions from limited warranty service)
  • Wherever you go, ASUS is always with you. 
That last line is either very comforting, or very unsettling. 
Underneath the card is the Taichi itself, wrapped in clear plastic.
Unfortunately, the display on the inside does not have a touchscreen; the way we're holding the stylus may give that impression. 
To the right is a small compartment that stores the power brick–which is about the size of those from ASUS' Android tablets–an active stylus (with AAA battery!), a VGA adapter, a USB-to-Ethernet adapter, and a small gray pouch to hold the adapters.
Underneath the notebook is a large gray pouch for the laptop itself, and underneath that is a small black box containing an LCD cleaning cloth–which will come in real handy with this system–a user manual, warranty card, and a cable tie.
That's all for now. Stay tuned for our full review of the ASUS Taichi.

Story: The House of 1000 Mirrors

There was place known as the House of 1000 Mirrors.

A small, happy little dog learned of this place and decided to visit. When he arrived, he bounced happily up the stairs to the doorway of the house.

He looked through the doorway with his ears lifted high and his tail wagging as fast as it could. To his great surprise, he found himself staring at 1000 other happy little dogs with their tails wagging just as fast as his. He smiled a great smile, and was answered with 1000 great smiles just as warm and friendly. As he left the House, he thought to himself, "This is a wonderful place. I will come back and visit it often."

In this same village, another little dog, who was not quite as happy as the first one, decided to visit the house. He slowly climbed the stairs and hung his head low as he looked into the door.

When he saw the 1000 unfriendly looking dogs staring back at him, he growled at them and was horrified to see 1000 little dogs growling back at him. As he left, he thought to himself, "That is a horrible place, and I will never go back there again."

All the faces in the world are mirrors. What kind of reflections do you see in the faces of the people you meet?

 
M Junaid Tahir
Read my Blog : http://paradigmwisdom.blogspot.com/
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