Blog Archive

8 Tips for a Successful Relationship

Having a good relationship can be tough to maintain for many couples. However, there are some things you can do and tips to learn to maintain a successful and happy relationship. Here are several tips to keep your successful relationship going for years to come.

1. Spending Quality Time Together: One main tip for having a successful relationship is spending quality time together. If you never have time for each other, then you both start to wonder, why you are together in the first place. Make it one of your main priorities to spend at least a couple of hours together a day. Even if you both work, this is a crucial attribute in a relationship. Make time for each other.

2. Setting Goals: Setting goals and making plans for the future can be a key in having a successful relationship. This shows that you are both in it for the long run. Think about where you both want to be in five years. Do you both want kids? Do you both want to build a new home together? These are questions to bring up, if you are both in it for a while.

3.Be Intimate:  Being affectionate and passionate in a relationship is a strong point for a successful relationship. Having intimate times throughout any time of the day is a great thing to do when making the relationship work. Running out of physical connections can lead to problems in a relationship. Therefore, for a successful long-term relationship, keep the intimacies going.

4. Be Supportive of Each Other: Be supportive of each other. Never judge each other, and hold blame. Remember that you are a team, never enemies. In order to be supportive of one another, root for each other daily.

6. Be Their Best Friend: Not only should you love your partner, but you also have to like them. Being in a successful relationship means that you have to be there best friend. Becoming friends first always helps to evolve into a long lasting relationship.

7. Trust Each Other: Trust is essential for having a successful courtship. You always need to have trust in your relationship in order to make it work for a long time. When there is no trust, is when you should worry. This could be an ugly feat to have in any relationship. Always put trust in each other. Jealousy can ruin a relationship in an instant.

8. Love Yourself: In order to have a successful relationship, you must love yourself first. You simply cannot love anybody else unless you have love for yourself. Having confidence and being secure with yourself is an important factor, when wanting to love someone else. If you are secure in yourself, you can be more secure in your relationship.

In having a successful relationship, you just have to roll with the punches, and take whatever you both are dealt. If you both stick together, there is nothing you both cannot handle. Be grateful you have each other, and always be caring. Taking in these few tips can make it all worth having a partner you can spend your whole life with.

Source:  

 
M Junaid Tahir
www.DailyTenMinutes.com 
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Everything You Do Matters

In a world of six billion people, it's easy to believe that the only way to initiate profound transformation is to take extreme action. Each of us, however, carries within us the capacity to change the world in small ways for better or worse. Everything we do and think affects the people in our lives, and their reactions in turn affect others. As the effect of a seemingly insignificant word passes from person to person, its impact grows and can become a source of great joy, inspiration, anxiety, or pain. Your thoughts and actions are like stones dropped into still waters, causing ripples to spread and expand as they move outward. The impact you have on the world is greater than you could ever imagine, and the choices you make can have far-reaching consequences. You can use the ripple effect to make a positive difference and spread waves of kindness that will wash over the world. 

Should the opportunity arise, the recipient of a good deed will likely feel compelled to do a good deed for someone else. Someone feeling the effects of negative energy will be more likely to pass on that negative energy. One act of charity, one thoughtful deed, or even one positive thought can pass from individual to individual, snowballing until it becomes a group movement or the ray of hope that saves someone's life. Every transformation, just like every ripple, has a point of origin. You must believe in your ability to be that point of origin if you want to use the ripples you create to spread goodness. Consider the effect of your thoughts and actions, and try to act graciously as much as possible.

A smile directed at a stranger, a compliment given to a friend, an attitude of laughter, or a thoughtful gesture can send ripples that spread among your loved ones and associates, out into your community, and finally throughout the world. You have the power to touch the lives of everyone you come into contact with and everyone those people come into contact with.The momentum of your influence will grow as your ripples moves onward and outward. One of those ripples could become a tidal wave of positivity.

 
M Junaid Tahir
www.DailyTenMinutes.com 
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Improved Attitude

No matter how good and positive your attitude may be, you can improve it. And when you improve your attitude, your attitude improves you.

To improve your attitude, you don't have to deny reality. When you improve your attitude, it doesn't mean things will be perfect.

What it means is that you'll be more positive, more effective, and more solidly focused on the best possibilities. What it means is that you'll live and act from a position of strength.

With an improved attitude, you can still clearly see all the problems. Yet instead of living in fear of them, you'll choose to be bigger than those problems.

Right now, there's a certain way you feel about life, and a certain way you expect life to be. Just think of what could happen if you made the choice to raise those expectations.

Whether you have a great attitude or a lousy one, decide today to improve it. For where your attitude goes, your life will quickly follow.

Courtesy: 
Ralph Marston - The Daily Motivator

 
M Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com 
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Story of Lamborghini and Ferrari

By Junaid Tahir


Mr. Lamborghini was born in 1916 to a working class farmer family. He grew up as a highly skilled mechanic and started his own tractor manufacturing  business. His business was very successful with the production rate of 400 tractors per month in 1960.


Being a wealthy man he bought a Ferrari 250GT and joined the league of those limited number of people who owned Ferrari at that time. He continually had mechanical problems with his Ferrari and soon he became embarrassed. After so many visits to Ferrari workshop he decided to meet Mr. Enzo Ferrari to complain in person. He went to Ferrari office and had to wait for hours to meet Enzo Ferrari. He told Mr. Enzo that their car is poor
.
 Mr Ferrari said to Elio Lamborghini that he can end up with driving a tractor but won't be able to handle a Ferrari properly.

That was the  moment Mr. Lamborghini decided that he would design his own sports V12 engine car and that's what he exactly did in coming days. Today we know Lamborghini company having €469 million Revenue in 2012. The company has produced several great cars including but not limited to Gallardo®, Aventador®, Sesto ELemento®  and Reventon®.



This is an inspiring story of the life of a person who established himself from a middle class farmer's family member to a billion dollar business executive. So what did he do differently to make himself a great success?
1-      He challenged the status quo situation and thought of doing something unique.  
2-      He took the initiative to design and produce something better than the best.
3-      He applied his creativity to produce V12 engine 

References:



About Author: Junaid Tahir is a passionate blogger. He writes articles on Leadership, General Awareness, Stress Management and Life Enhancement subjects at his personal blog

6 Cs to Avoid in Life



By Junaid Tahir:

Everyone one wants to stay happy in life but only small fraction of people put efforts on the factors which can bring happiness. Some factors are required to work on and some factors to be avoided... In this article 6 factors are discussed which are recommended to be avoided in order to achieve extreme heights of happiness and peace of mind.

Conspiring
This is one of the extreme ethical crimes I can think of. You conspire when you plan secretly (alone or with others) against someone to do something which is harmful and unlawful. In the court of humanity this is a punishable act and nature always takes revenge form you for the things you do against humanity. 

Criticizing:
While healthy criticism helps improve things but most of the time you criticize with no clear positive intention. The more you criticize this way, the more you pollute your own mind and build up negative powers which back fires in terms of added stress due to negativity. Also criticizing is an indication that you are not part of solutions instead  you are part of problems. So if you would like to live a happy life then no negative criticism please. 
Cursing:
Cursing is opposite of blessing which means the one who curses is away from blessing.  Both cursing and blessing are indirectly proportional to each other. The more you curse people the more you make yourself away from them and also from the blessings of Almighty. Control your thoughts to control your tongue. Daily audit at the end of each day will help improve your habit of cursing. This will improve your mental health and strengthen your inner powers. 
Complaining:
Your complaining attitude reduces your social circle. When you start complaining about circumstances, about people around you and so on, you give up your energies to strive and eventually you weaken your relations with others and also lose your grip on your goals. This act degrades you in your social group and eventually you lose respect. Try speaking positive or stay silent. 
  
Complicating
Mind your own business. If you can't help don't complicate their problems. Don't confuse people by raising complicated questions.  Speak up only if you have a positive advice and neat intention. Remember, giving advice is a matter of honesty so put yourself in others' shoes; listen empathically and then advice in the best interest of your companion.   

Corrupting:
Corruption is a phenomenon of moral or economical deviation from the ideal. Corruption is a world-wide social disease which has spread like jungle fire and impacting millions of lives every day consequently polluting every society. May it be financial corruption, Ethical corruption or Relationship corruption, it is consistently polluting societies aDnd families. The more you earn with illicit acts the more you push yourself away from the state of contentment. Illegal acts always have reaction exactly equal or more than the magnitude of the actions you do. 

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About Author: Junaid Tahir is a passionate blogger. He writes articles on Leadership, Stress Management and Life Enhancement subjects at his personal blog
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What Stress Actually Does to You and What You Can Do About It


Stress is an unpleasant fact of life. We all experience it for various reasons, and we all try to come up with ways of coping with it—some with more success than others. So what exactly is stress doing to your mind (and body) when you're staring down a deadline? And what can you do to power through it?


The real problem with stress is that, for such a well understood and universally experienced condition, as a society we deal with it so poorly that it leads to many of our most lethal illnesses and long-term health problems. High blood pressure, heart disease, cancer, stroke, obesity, and insomnia are all medical conditions across the spectrum that can be related to or directly influenced by high stress as an environmental condition.

In order to cut through some of that fog, let's take a brief look at what stress is, how it impacts us on a physical and mental level, and finally what we can do about it, with the help of some experts. Photo by bottled_void.


Defining Stress: Acute and ChronicEveryone experiences stress in some way, shape, or form. We all recognize when we're in stressful situations, and we all know when we're stressed. At the same time, stress is more than just a feeling that we have a lot to deal with. For the purposes of our explainer, we're focusing on so-called "bad stress," as opposed to "good stress," like the kind of you experience on a roller coaster (if you went on willingly), when you get a big promotion, or kiss someone for the first time. Aside from good stress, there are primarily two types of stress: Acute (short-term) stress that's usually a response to a specific influence (called a stressor), and chronic (long-term) stress that sticks with you and could either have sprung from a short-term stress that stuck with you, or a constant state of stress that you're under due to persistent stressors and conditions. Photo by Becky Wetherington.

Acute Stress:
Acute stress is the type of stress you experience when you have an immediate reaction to something you're presented with. This is the "in the moment" kind of fight or flight response that you have when you have to speak in a meeting, your boss just asked you to stay late, you're startled by a sudden noise, or someone on the internet makes a ill-informed comment about your favorite smartphone platform/operating system/hardware manufacturer. (How could they!?)


Acute stress is defined by the fact that it's immediate and short term. In most cases, once the stressor has been removed, your body and mind return to a normal state.


Chronic Stress: Chronic stress is entirely different, and is characterized by its long-term nature. This is the type of stressthat you feel that you're under every day, with no reprieve from the things that make you feel stressed. Most chronic stressors are situations, for example, in which you dislike your job and detest going every day, being there all day, and thinking about it when you leave. Living paycheck-to-paycheck and struggling with financial security issues is another common source of chronic stress that many people are familiar with.
Its these types of chronic stress situations that are the most dangerous. They keep your body's defenses activated and heightened longer than is generally healthy, and unfortunately more and more of us are living under constant conditions that create stress. Add to this the fact that "coping with stress" isn't exactly a topic you learn in school and you have a recipe for a lot of very unhappy people.

What's Actually Happening When You're Stressed
Your body shows signs of stress in two ways: first, the rush of hormones that elevate your heart rate, boost your blood pressure, and stop your digestion, and then second the symptoms that you experience and are aware of, like clenched teeth, headaches, and emotional upset.

Most of us can tell when we're stressed momentarily, or are just feeling stressed out generally, but there's a lot going on inside our bodies when we're stressed that play a role in our health.

Symptoms: The most common and recognizable symptoms of stress are the ones most of us know all too well: insomnia, headaches, jaw pain, back and neck pain, stuttering, heartburn and nausea, nervousness and anxiety, fidgeting, nail-biting, lateness and trouble focusing, and a lack of interest in work or activities that are normally interesting. The American Institute of Stress (AIS) has a list of 50 common signs and symptoms of stress that include these, but also note a number of other symptoms that you may not have immediately associated with stress and not another condition like depression.

For example, behavioral changes that lead to other conditions can also be signs of stress, like addictive tendencies, a sudden interest in smoking, alcohol, excessive eating, or gambling, or any other addictive behavior that can be interpreted as an escape from chronic stressors. Often, even subconsciously, many of us try to escape stressful situations or conditions by blocking them out or escaping by way of anything that makes us feel better. Even if it's fleeting, it's common to search out an escape so you can relax for a while. Photo by The American Institute of Stress.

I spoke with Roger S. Gil, MAMFT, about some of the less productive ways people cope with stress, and he highlighted that trying to escape without dealing with the actual stressor is more common than you may think. "Overeating, displaced anger, denial, defensiveness, etc. All are signs of avoidance and coping strategies that are meant to protect the ego from the discomfort caused by the stressor…and none of them do anything about the stressor," he explained. "Withdrawing (i.e. checking out mentally) from the situation at hand is something I see A LOT of in my work with couples. For example a husband may withdraw into his own little world when his wife complains about something. Instead of hearing her concerns, he pulls away and encourages her to nag him some more…which causes more withdrawal."

These behavioral changes cut both ways though: the AIS notes that stress reactions can also lead to isolation, loneliness, and severe depression as well. If you've been suddenly feeling alone, forgetful, overly defensive, disorganized, uninterested in your everyday life, overwhelmed by what's going on around you to the point where you need to lie about them, and having difficulty communicating with others, it's possible that chronic, poorly managed stress may be part of the problem.


Physiological Effects of Stress: While stress is most often discussed in terms of how it changes our mental and emotional condition, stressors and stressful situations also have a profound impact on our bodies. Stressors, whether they're acute or chronic, immediately set off the body's fight-or-flight response, flooding your system with stress hormones like norepinephrine and cortisol that are meant to give you a needed boost in dangerous situations.

In short and small bursts, those hormones can make you more alert, more perceptive, raise your heart rate so your muscles get more blood to them, and raise your breathing rate so you get more oxygen into your lungs. Your digestive processes stop entirely so your body doesn't waste energy processing food when it needs all the energy it can muster to survive. It's a good thing if, say, you're dashing across a busy street or escaping a burning building, but keeping your body's fight or flight response turned on all the time and those stress hormones at high levels in your body is unhealthy, as this eHealth article explains.

If these hormones stay in your system for too long, they can eventually lead to high blood pressure and increased heart rate, stress-induced hypertension and stroke risk, ulcers and other gastrointestinal distress, a suppressed immune system, fatigue, sexual issues like impotence and decreased libido. After all, those stress hormones are meant to be in our systems for a short period while we deal with an acute stressor, at a time where we need all of our faculties about us. Over the long term, keeping the body on full alert is more of a detriment than a benefit.



What You Can Do About StressOnce you recognize the effects of stress and understand the damage you're doing to your body by not coming up with ways to cope with the stress that you're under, it's time to do something about it. I spoke with clinical psychologist Jeffrey DeGroat, PhD about some of the ways you can reduce the impact that chronic stress has on you and how to cope with acute stressors.

Dealing with Acute Stressors:
If the stressor is acute and temporary, Dr. DeGroat suggests applying simple relaxationtechniques like deep breathing, to calm the mind and the body so you can get the clarity you need to address the situation. He proposes taking a 10-second breathing cycle: breathe in for four seconds, and then out for six seconds. "Works as a thought distraction," he says, "as well as physically slowing down heart rate. This is a good technique to use anytime and anywhere." Photo by Shawn Rossi.


Previously mentioned app CalmDown for Mac is a utility designed just for situations like this: it encourages you to take a deep breath (or a few) so you can step back from the stressor for a moment, gather your thoughts, and push through the fog of frustration and anger that often come with stressors.

I also spoke with Roger Gil about dealing with stressful situations and he reinforced the point: "Stressors like these can produce physical responses at first; so if you're heart is racing, you're short of breath, or you feel your muscles tightening somewhere in your body, know that you're feeling a physiological stress response. In those cases, channeling your awareness of your body can sometimes distract a person away from the area of the body having the stress response." Recognizing that you're having a physical reaction will help you calm down and deal with the situation the way you really want to, as opposed to letting it stew in your mind only to come up with what you wanted to say 15 minutes after you should have said it.

In that vein, Dr. DeGroat explains that figuring out what you wanted to say a few minutes after you said it is very common, and often a result of being unprepared for the stressful situation you're presented with. Aside from making sure to be ready for those situations in advance if you can be, he suggests acknowledging that you're stressed in the situation and telling the person or people you're dealing with that you'll get back to them later. Photo by Sasha Wolff.

"Rather than responding immediately with something we may regret later, or not saying anything at all," he says, "another option might be to indicate to the person that you'll talk to them later about the situation. For example, [imagine] you find out that a co-worker is dating an ex-boyfriend/girlfriend of yours. Rather than yelling at them and making yourself look out of control, or saying 'oh, that's cool,' when you're really upset about it, you could say, 'let's not get into this right now.' This will give you some time to collect your thoughts and approach them on your terms and on your time." Time, as Dr. DeGroat explains, is key to defusing acute stressors, letting your body and mind return to normal, and giving yourself the space to deal with them in a healthy way.


Dealing with Chronic Stressors: Stressors that you deal with on a daily basis or that are always hanging over your head are a different matter entirely. Usually they give you a little more time and space to deal with the thing that's making you stressed, and there are other relaxation techniques for stressors that may not require action on your part right away, or stressors that are always lurking in the background, like your boss, for example.

Visualization is one way to relax yourself when you're presented with a stressor that you don't need to respond to immediately. Dr. DeGroat suggests that if you can, take five to ten minutes to immerse yourself in the most relaxing environment you can possibly imagine, whether it's green fields, a chair by the sea, or your favorite easy chair at home. Focus on as much of that environment as possible, trying to manifest the sounds, smells, and details about it in your head. The more you do this, the farther away you'll get from the thing that's bothering you. It won't make that thing go away, but it will give you a little clarity of mind and distance from the stressor. Photo by Gabriel Pollard.

If you have additional time to relax and some space to be alone, Dr. DeGroat suggests progressive muscle relaxation to defuse some of the natural tension that comes with being stressed. "Systematically tense and relax muscle groups, beginning at your toes and working your way all to the top of your head. [This] serves as a distraction from current stressors and can help reduce physical tension that often accompanies stress."

Another tip Dr. DeGroat offers is to identify whether level of stress and your response to it is realistic or unrealistic when you're in the middle of it. If it's realistic, as in anyone would respond the same way and there's something you can do about it (like your computer froze or you just dropped something,) then address the situation and move on. If the response is unrealistic and others may not respond the same way (traffic isn't moving fast enough or security lines at the airport are too slow,) then address yourself: calm down, step back, and try to relax.

The first step to addressing yourself is to challenge the way you're thinking about the stressor. "Challenging these automatic thoughts that often hijack our minds and promote stress has been shown in research to be a great way to help break the patterns of thinking & behaving that are counterproductive/harmful," Roger Gil explained. "Once the 'mental battle' is won, the IRL battle is more easily handled."

Granted, none of these measures have to be practiced only in the context of chronic stress, but it is more likely that if your boss is getting on your nerves again today or the rent is due and you're worried about being able to afford groceries, you're more likely to take a few minutes and address how you feel so you can approach the issues in a clear manner than you are if you're stuck in a meeting and asked to speak on a topic you weren't ready for.


How to Deal with Stress In the FutureWhen I asked Dr. DeGroat how we could deal with certain kinds of stress that seem to crop up from time to time, like an overbearing extended family or an aggressive and disrespectful employer, he pointed out that while there are ways to deal with each situation on its own merits, much of the stress that gets to us the most comes from relationships. "Really, I believe stress in relationships (occupational, family, social), often includes difficulties with setting and maintaining boundaries. Others seem to expect too much from us. Rather than setting our own limits/boundaries, we allow others to cross these boundaries, and end up feeling irritated and resentful. One of the best ways to prevent stress in relationships is to identify our own limits/boundaries and hold to them," he says. Photo by Joel Mendoza.

In some cases, it may simply be better to remove yourself from chronic stressors if you're having difficulty adapting to them or minimizing them. After all, if your job is wearing you down and there's no improving it, it may be time to look for a new job. If your relationship is so stressful it's destructive for everyone in it, it may be time to break it off, and if your apartment is run down and your landlord won't fix it, it's time to move out. There are plenty of good reasons to learn to cope with stress, but there are other equally good reasons to remove the stress from your life when you can.

To that end, there's no real way to live a completely stress-free life. Remember, there are positive stressors as well as negative ones, and the positive ones are usually good experiences that we enjoy or seek out. The same applies for negative stressors: they're bound to happen eventually and avoiding them is a futile effort. The key is in knowing how to deal with them, and how to minimize their effect on you.

If the stress you're experiencing is chronic, consider other activities like taking up a hobby, meditating, or traveling—anything that can take your mind off of those stressors and provide a healthy outlet where you can relax. "Other helpful stressful coping mechanisms are exercise, doing an activity you're good at that won't worsen the stress (e.g. cooking, video games, etc), and watching a very engrossing movie/TV show," Gil said, "Sometimes interrupting the state of stress a person is in with an activity they enjoy is enough to keep them from losing control."

There's no magic formula for dealing with stress, but employing coping mechanisms that give you distance, helps you get through the moment, and at best minimizes the overall impact the stressor has on you are a good way to stay healthy, happy, and productive. Photo by Jacob Bøtter.
"It is how we approach it that can cause us problems, or allow us to grow. The more control we can find within a situation, or over ourselves, the more likely we will grow from the situation," Dr. DeGroat explained, "The more we are able to identify and act upon the control and choice we have in situations, the less debilitating the stress will be."


This is just a short introduction, but unsurprisingly, entire books have been written on the topic of stress, its medical and psychological implications, and how you can deal with it in healthy ways. While we hope we've given you some insight into how your body reacts to stressors and how you can manage them in the moment and on the long term, we know that this is by no means an exhaustive study into the topic. What are some of your most successful ways of dealing with stressful situations, both short and long-term? Share your suggestions in the comments

source: Lifehacker 
 

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15 Tips to Manage Politics at Work Place


Following is a fantastic list of recommendations to avoid or manage politics at work place:
  1. Understand the role of each manager clearly
  2. Master your political tools (compromise, arbitration, escalation)
  3. Know your limitations and boundaries about giving
    comments on others
  4. Be a positive minded professional
  5. Learn to read the winds of change
  6. Have a best friend at work
  7. Learn the art of public speaking
  8. Keep any eye on the sharks 
  9. Be prepared for the tough and hard talks
  10. Don't overspend your time on small events/things 
  11. Speak last
  12. Absolutely no favoritism. Treat everyone logically, respectfully and fairly. 
  13. Always think before you act.
  14. Make friendship with like minded group of professional
  15. Seek out a mentor
    Source: Unknown

Experiencing Others' Pain --- A Win Win Situation This Way

By Junaid Tahir

The mosque is 5 minutes walk from the home and the passage is shade-less which means if a person has to walk to reach for Zohr prayer, he has to walk in sun all the way.  Considering 45 degrees temperature plus the hot air flow its little hard task to reach the mosque. The alternate is to reach there is by driving the car. Yet Mr Nasir thought to go to mosque by walk with the following two advantages:
  1. When you walk in the heat, you feel a little portion of the pain which gardeners, guards and cleaners have to go through daily while performing their duties. This kills your ego and make you feel like a down to earth person. And if you keep experiencing this pain, you tend to spend money for their benefits in terms of food, clothing etc.
  2. The dull and luxurious life style now a days has given birth to so many fatal diseases including heart choking, high sugar, high blood pressure, high uric acid etc.  Little physical work like this constitutes towards a healthy body and refrain it from developing chronic diseases. Further, sweating has several advantages like cleaner skin, lowering body temperature and guarding against sickness. Read this health article here.


So Mr Nasir selected the wise WIN – WIN option which is good for himself as well as for the society; directly or indirectly. 















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About Author: Junaid Tahir is a passionate blogger. He writes articles on Leadership, Stress Management and Life Enhancement subjects at his personal blog

Story: The Customer, his Car and the Ice Cream


The complaint read: "This is the second time I have written to you, and I don't blame you for not answering me, because I sounded crazy, but it is a fact that we have a tradition in our family of ice cream for dessert after dinner. Every time I buy a vanilla ice cream, when I start back from the store my car won't start. If I get any other kind of ice cream, the car starts just fine. I want you to know I'm serious about this, no matter how silly it sounds: "What is there about a car that makes it not start when I get vanilla ice cream, and easy to start whenever I get any other kind?"

The President of the company was understandably skeptical about the letter, but sent an engineer who arranged to meet the man just after dinnertime at the ice cream store.  The first night, they got chocolate. The car started. The second night, they got strawberry. The car started. The third night he ordered vanilla. The car failed to start.

Now the engineer refused to believe that this man's car was allergic to vanilla ice cream. He arranged to continue his visits for as long as it took to solve the problem. So, he began to take notes: time of day, type of gas used, time to drive back and forth etc. He then noticed that the customer took less time to buy vanilla than any other flavour, as it was kept at the front of the store. All the other flavours were kept at the back of the store, so it took longer to get them.

The clue triggered a chain of thought - why wouldn't the car start when it took less time? The solution then became obvious to the engineer, "when he returned to the car quickly, the vapour lock did not cool in time for the car to re-start".

Do your customers (internal and external) have complaints? 
Do you ignore some of the complaints or think out of box to resolve them?

 
M Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com 
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Dear Bad Manager

1.  Never give me work in the morning.  Always wait until 4:00
pm and then bring it to me.
2.  If it's really a "rush job", run in and interrupt me every 10 minutes to inquire how it's going.
3.  Always leave without telling anyone where you're going.
4.  Wait until my yearly review and THEN tell me what my goals SHOULD have been.
5.  If you give me more than one job to do, don't tell me which is the priority.
6.  Do your best to keep me late.  I adore this office and really have nowhere to go or anything to do. I have no life beyond work.
7.  If a job I do pleases you, keep it a secret. If that gets out, it could mean a promotion.
8.  If you don't like my work, tell everyone.
9.  If you have special instructions for a job, don't write them down. In fact, save them until the job is almost done.
10. Never introduce me to the people you're with.  I have no right to know anything. 
11. Tell me all your little problems.  No one else has any and it's nice to know someone is less fortunate.

Story: Coffee, Carrot and Egg

A daughter complained to her father about life and how things were so hard for her. She did not know how she was going to make it and wanted to give up. She was tired of struggling. It seemed that as soon as one problem was solved, a new one arose.

Her father, a chef, took her to the kitchen. He filled three pots with water and placed each on a high fire. Soon the pots came to a boil. In one he placed carrots, in the second he placed eggs, and the last he placed ground coffee beans. He let them sit and boil, without saying a word. 

Carrot Egg Coffee

The daughter sucked her teeth and impatiently waited, wondering what he was doing. In about twenty minutes he turned off the burners. He fished the carrots out and placed them in a bowl. He pulled the eggs out and placed them a bowl. Then he ladled the coffee out and placed it in a
bowl.Turning to her he asked. "What do you see?" "Carrots, eggs, and coffee," she replied. 

He brought her closer and asked her to feel the carrots. She did and noted that they were soft. He then asked her to take an egg and break it. After pulling off the shell, she observed the hard-boiled egg.

Steaming Cup of Coffee

Finally, he asked her to sip the coffee. She smiled as she tasted its rich aroma. She said, "What's the point?" He explained that each of the items had faced the same adversity - boiling water - but each reacted differently. The carrot went in strong and hard. But after being subjected to the boiling water, it softened and became weak. The egg had been fragile. Its thin outer shell had protected its liquid interior. But after sitting through the boiling water, its inside became hardened. The ground coffee beans were unique, however. After they were in the boiling water, they had changed the water. 

"Which are you?" he asked his daughter. "When adversity knocks on your door, how do you respond? Are you a carrot, an egg, or a coffee bean?" 

 
M Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com 
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Handling Criticism

Rather than trying to avoid criticism, expert performers welcome it. They seek out coaches and advisers who can give them constructive, sometimes even painful feedback. They then use this feedback as a guide for steady improvement.

Here are some steps you can take to handle criticism effectively:

1. Acknowledge Your Error
- Acknowledging a mistake is not the same as acknowledging that you are an inferior person/a failure. If you believe the criticism is accurate, take full responsibility. Don't blame something or someone else and don't make excuses. If appropriate, offer a diplomatic apology: "I'm sorry that my actions led to that result. It certainly was not my intention." Again, if appropriate, ask for suggestions on how you can improve your performance the next time.
   
2. Take Corrective Action
- After you've heard the other person out completely, and listened to any suggestions for improvement, state/communicate your eagerness to improve in the future. If appropriate, describe any actions you will take at his time to counterbalance your previous error.

3. Acknowledge the other person's motive
- Thank the other person for the feedback and make sure to state how valuable you consider it. This demonstrates your ability to use criticism as a way to improve – an essential quality of a leader. In addition, let the other person know that you are open to receiving his or her feedback in the future.

Even when you don't care for the style in which criticism is presented, be thankful that the other person is willing to give you feedback, and along with it, an opportunity to improve.
 
K.N.RAJAN

M Junaid Tahir

www.DailyTenMinutes.com
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