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Are you as Ambitious as Steve Jobs, Maradona and Picasso?


 By Junaid Tahir
Ambition, by definition, is to have strong inner desire in order to achieve something plus the willingness of striving in order to achieve it. The goal can be in terms of wealth, education, job promotion, honour or fame. When you are ambitious you posses great deal of energy inside your brain and heart. This energy acts as fuel to perform all the necessary steps in order to achieve what you want to achieve. You play your 'games' like Maradona; you imagine and paint your 'life portraits' like Picasso and you act like Steve Jobs when it comes to creativity and innovation.
However this does not mean that if you do not have expertise as those of Maradona or Pablo Picasso or Steve Jobs, you cannot be ambitious. The purpose of mentioning these personalities is that the level of energy you should be striving for should be as that of such personalities. You should not limit the size of your dreams. People who aim high, achieve high. It doesn't matter who you are; what matters is what you want to be. 

So if you are ambitious, check yourself against these qualities:
1- Do you have a concrete goal. Have to your tried writing your short term and long term goals on a piece of paper. Trust me, it helps a lot. Even I suggest writing it on a paper and paste it somewhere in your room so that you keep looking at it multiple times a day. 
2- Do you have solid vision on how you are going to achieve it?  Have you thought what actions do you need to perform? Have you arranged the resources in order to move ahead?
3- Are you a genuine ambitious person having burning desire to achieve? Know this story? Once a young man asked Socrates the secret to success. He took the young man to the river and ducked him into the water. The boy tried hard to take his head out but Socrates was strong enough to hold him there for some more seconds. Then later Socrates asked him what was the most important thing he wanted when the head was in water? They boy said, "Oxygen and I was too desperate to have it". Socrates said, "this is the level of burning desire which you must possess for your goals. When you have it, you will succeed"
Remember, failing to plan is planning to fail. So the core advice of this article is to have a Analytical thinking, concrete action plan, fearless mind-set, positive thought process and consistent attitude in order to convert your ambitions into realities. Develop the power of now and start behaving the person you want to be.

Some recommended articles: 
Hard work will Guarantee my Success?
9 Tips to Make Effective Decisions
7 Tips for Peace of Mind
Story: Mr Educated and Mr Wisdom
Stop Complaining Start Achieving 

Story - Sharpen your skills


Once upon a time a very strong woodcutter asked for a job with a timber merchant, and he got it. His salary was really good and so were the working conditions. For that reason, the woodcutter was determined to do his best.
His boss gave him an axe and showed him the area where he was supposed to fell the trees. The first day, the woodcutter brought down 15 trees.


" Congratulations," the boss said. " Carry on with your work!"
 Highly motivated by the words of his boss, the woodcutter tried harder the next day, but he only could bring 10 trees down. The third day he tried even harder, but he was only able to bring down 7 trees.


Day after day he was bringing lesser number of trees down.
" I must be losing my strength", the woodcutter thought. He went to the boss and apologized, saying that he could not understand what was going on.
" When was the last time you sharpened your axe?" the boss asked.
" Sharpen? I had no time to sharpen my axe. I have been very busy trying to cut trees..."

That's right. Most of us NEVER update our skills. We think that whatever we have learned is very much enough. But good is not good when better is expected. Sharpening our skills from time to time is the key to success.

Health: Top Ten Best Food For Healthy Hair


We all know that a well-balanced diet is healthy for our body and critical for optimal health and performance. Our hair is no different. A mixture of protein, complex carbohydrates, vitamins, min
erals and iron are all required for healthy, strong hair.

It's all about balance when it comes to optimal nutrition for maintaining healthy hair. "Hair is a fast-growing tissue and it's likely to make demands on your body," says Brian Thompson, principal trichologist and director of product development at Philip Kingsley Trichological Centre in New York and London. "You need a mixture of protein, complex carbohydrates, and vitamins and minerals. But if you consume too much of any one thing, particularly certain vitamins and minerals, you can create problems with hair growth."

Read on for the 10 top foods that should be the foundation of your healthy hair diet.




Carrots

Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A, which promotes a healthy scalp along with good vision. Since a healthy scalp is essential for a shiny, well-conditioned head of hair, you'd be wise to include carrots in your diet as snacks or toppings on your salad.




Low-Fat Dairy Products


Low-fat dairy products like skim milk and yogurt are great sources of calcium, an important mineral for hair growth.
They also contain whey and casein, two high-quality protein sources. For some healthy hair foods "to-go," try throwing a yogurt or cottage cheese cup in your bag when you head out in the morning to snack on later in the day. You can even boost their hair benefits by stirring in a couple of tablespoons of ground flaxseeds or walnuts for omega-3 fatty acids and zinc.





Oysters

Oysters may be better known for their reputation as an aphrodisiac, but they can also lead to healthy hair and who doesn't love that?
The key to their love and hair-boosting abilities is zinc a powerful antioxidant. If oysters don't make a regular appearance on your dinner plate, don't despair. In addition to getting it from whole grains and nuts, you can also get zinc from beef and lamb.





Whole Grains

Sink your teeth into hearty whole grains, including whole-wheat bread and fortified whole-grain breakfast cereals, for a hair-healthy dose of zinc, iron, and B vitamins.
A whole-grain snack can also be a great go-to food when your energy is zapped halfway through the afternoon, and you've still got hours to go before dinner.





Eggs

When it comes to healthy hair, it doesn't matter whether you like your eggs scrambled, fried, or over easy.
However they're served up, eggs are one of the best protein sources you can find. They also contain biotin and vitamin B-12, which are important beauty nutrients.





Nuts

Do you go nuts for thick, shiny hair? You should. Brazil nuts are one of nature's best sources of selenium, an important mineral for the health of your scalp.
Walnuts contain alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid that may help condition your hair.
They are also a terrific source of zinc, as are cashews, pecans, and almonds. A zinc deficiency can lead to hair shedding, so make sure nuts are a regular on your healthy hair menu.





Beans

Beans, beans, they're good for your … hair? Yes, it's true. Legumes like kidney beans and lentils should be an important part of your hair-care diet.
Not only do they provide plentiful protein to promote hair growth, but ample iron, zinc, and biotin. While rare, biotin deficiencies can result in brittle hair. Blatner, who is also a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, recommends three or more cups of lentils or beans each week.





Dark Green Vegetables

Popeye the Sailor Man didn't eat all that spinach for healthy hair, but he could have. Spinach, like broccoli and Swiss chard, is an excellent source of vitamins A and C, which your body needs to produce sebum.
The oily substance, secreted by your hair follicles, is the body's natural hair conditioner. Dark green vegetables also provide iron and calcium.





Water


If you have dry hair or just want to prevent straw-like strands drink more. "Hair is one-quarter water," White says.
He recommends the typical eight glasses a day. Bring a water bottle to work so you don't spend the entire day refilling your mug at the fountain.





Red Meat


If you don't have high cholesterol, Thompson recommends eating red meat twice a week for optimal hair health. Not only does red meat have the protein you need, but also B vitamins, iron, and zinc, important minerals for healthy hair.


Top 10 Most Expensive Foods in the World


10. Matsutake Mushrooms – $1000/pound

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

9. The World's Most Expensive Bagel – $1000

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

8. The Zillion Dollar Frittata – $1000

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

7. Wagyu Steak – $2800

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

6. Samundari Khazana, the World's Most Expensive Curry – $3200

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net
 

5. Domenico Crolla's "Pizza Royale 007″ – $4200

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

4. Dansuke Watermelon – $6,100

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

3. Yubari Melons – $22,872

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

2. Almas Caviar – $25,000

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

1. Italian White Alba Truffle – $160,406

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net
 

  

50 Brainstorming Questions to Generate A Bright Idea!

from
 Tickled By Life
 by Derek Cheshire

When you have a bright idea there is always someone who takes the wind out of your sails by asking "What about …?" Why not preempt them by doing a little homework first? Below are 50 questions, variations on the usual who, what, why, when, where. Think your idea through using these as prompts and see if you can improve your idea.

Who

1. Who is affected by the problem?
2. Who else has it?
3. Who says it is a problem?
4. Who would like a solution?
5. Who would not like a solution?
6. Who could prevent a solution?
7. Who needs it solved more than you?

When

8. When does it occur?
9. When doesn't it occur?
10. When did it appear?
11. When will it disappear?
12. When do other people see your problem as a problem?
13. When don't other people see your problem as a problem?
14. When is the solution needed?
15. When might it occur again?
16. When will it get worse?
17. When will it get better?

Why

18. Why is this situation a problem?
19. Why do you want to solve it?
20. Why don't you want to solve it?
21. Why doesn't it go away?
22. Why would someone else want to solve it?
23. Why wouldn't someone else want to solve it?
24. Why is it easy to solve?
25. Why is it hard to solve?

What

26. What might change about it?
27. What are its main weaknesses?
28. What do you like about it?
29. What do you dislike about it?
30. What can be changed about it?
31. What can't be changed?
32. What do you know about it?
33. What don't you know about it?
34. What will it be like if it is solved?
35. What will it be like if it isn't solved?
36. What have you done in the past with similar problems?
37. What principles underlie it?
38. What values underlie it?
39. What problem elements are related to one another?
40. What assumptions are you making about it?
41. What seems to be most important about it?
42. What seems to be least important about it?
43. What are the sub-problems?
44. What are your major objectives in solving it?
45. What else do you need to know?

Where

46. Where is it most noticeable?
47. Where is it least noticeable?
48. Where else does it exist?
49. Where is the best place to begin looking for solutions?
50. Where does it fit in the larger scheme of things?

 ___________

M Junaid Tahir 

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What Parents Can Do to Change Their Child's Behavior


How do I stop misbehavior?

The best way to stop unwanted behavior is to ignore it. This way works best over a period of time. When you want the behavior to stop immediately, you can use the time-out method.

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How do I use the time-out method?

Decide ahead of time the behaviors that will result in a time-out (usually tantrums, or aggressive or dangerous behavior). Choose a time-out place that is uninteresting for the child and not frightening, such as a chair, corner or playpen. When you're away from home, consider using a car or a nearby seating area as a time-out place.

When the unacceptable behavior occurs, tell the child the behavior is unacceptable and give a warning that you will put him or her in time-out if the behavior doesn't stop. Remain calm and don't look angry. If your child goes on misbehaving, calmly take him or her to the time-out area.

If possible, keep track of how long your child's been in time-out. Set a timer so your child will know when time-out is over. Time-out should be brief (generally 1 minute for each year of age), and should begin immediately after reaching the time-out place or after the child calms down. You should stay within sight or earshot of the child, but don't talk to him or her. If the child leaves the time-out area, gently return him or her to the area and consider resetting the timer. When the time-out is over, let the child leave the time-out place. Don't discuss the bad behavior, but look for ways to reward and reinforce good behavior later on.

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How do I encourage a new, desired behavior?

One way to encourage good behavior is to use a reward system. Children who learn that bad behavior is not tolerated and that good behavior is rewarded are learning skills that will last them a lifetime. This works best in children older than 2 years of age. It can take up to 2 months to work. Being patient and keeping a diary of behavior can be helpful to parents. 

Choose 1 to 2 behaviors you would like to change (for example, bedtime habits, tooth brushing or picking up toys). Choose a reward your child would enjoy. Examples of good rewards are an extra bedtime story, delaying bedtime by half an hour, a preferred snack or, for older children, earning points toward a special toy, a privilege or a small amount of money.

Explain the desired behavior and the reward to the child. For example, "If you get into your pajamas and brush your teeth before this TV show is over, you can stay up a half hour later." Request the behavior only one time. If the child does what you ask, give the reward. You can help the child if necessary but don't get too involved. Because any attention from parents, even negative attention, is so rewarding to children, they may prefer to have parental attention instead of a reward at first. Transition statements, such as, "In 5 minutes, play time will be over," are helpful when you are teaching your child new behaviors.

This system helps you avoid power struggles with your child. However, your child is not punished if he or she chooses not to behave as you ask; he or she simply does not get the reward.

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What are some good ways to reward my child?

Beat the Clock (good method for a dawdling child)

Ask the child to do a task. Set a timer. If the task is done before the timer rings, your child gets a reward. To decide the amount of time to give the child, figure out your child's "best time" to do that task and add 5 minutes. 

The Good Behavior Game (good for teaching a new behavior)

Write a short list of good behaviors on a chart and mark the chart with a star each time you see the good behavior. After your child has earned a small number of stars (depending on the child's age), give him or her a reward. 

Good Marks/Bad Marks (best method for difficult, highly active children)

In a short time (about an hour) put a mark on a chart or on your child's hand each time you see him or her performing a good behavior. For example, if you see your child playing quietly, solving a problem without fighting, picking up toys or reading a book, you would mark the chart. After a certain number of marks, give your child a reward. You can also make negative marks each time a bad behavior occurs. If you do this, only give your child a reward if there are more positive marks than negative marks. 

Developing Quiet Time (often useful when you're making supper)

Ask your child to play quietly alone or with a sibling for a short time (maybe 30 minutes). Check on your child frequently (every 2 to 5 minutes, depending on the child's age) and give a reward or a token for each few minutes they were quiet or playing well. Gradually increase the intervals (go from checking your child's behavior every 2 to 5 minutes to checking every 30 minutes), but continue to give rewards for each time period your child was quiet or played well.

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What else can I do to help my child behave well?

Make a short list of important rules and go over them with your child. Avoid power struggles, no-win situations and extremes. When you think you've overreacted, it's better to use common sense to solve the problem, even if you have to be inconsistent with your reward or punishment method. Avoid doing this often as it may confuse your child. 

Accept your child's basic personality, whether it's shy, social, talkative or active. Basic personality can be changed a little, but not very much. Try to avoid situations that can make your child cranky, such as becoming overly stimulated, tired or bored. Don't criticize your child in front of other people. Describe your child's behavior as bad, but don't label your child as bad. Praise your child often when he or she deserves it. Touch him or her affectionately and often. Children want and need attention from their parents. 

Develop little routines and rituals, especially at bedtimes and meal times. Provide transition remarks (such as "In 5 minutes, we'll be eating dinner."). Allow your child choices whenever possible. For example, you can ask, "Do you want to wear your red pajamas or your blue pajamas to bed tonight?"

As children get older, they may enjoy becoming involved in household rule making. Don't debate the rules at the time of misbehavior, but invite your child to participate in rule making at another time.

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Why shouldn't I use physical punishment?

Parents may choose to use physical punishment (such as spanking) to stop undesirable behavior. The biggest drawback to this method is that although the punishment stops the bad behavior for a while, it doesn't teach your child to change his or her behavior. Disciplining your child is really just teaching him or her to choose good behaviors. If your child doesn't know a good behavior, he or she is likely to return to the bad behavior. Physical punishment becomes less effective with time and can cause the child to behave aggressively. It can also be carried too far -- into child abuse. Other methods of punishment are preferred and should be used whenever possible.

http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/children/parents/behavior/201.html

What Parents Can Do to Change Their Child's Behavior

 
M Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com 
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Highest Vision


Look up from what you're doing and look around for a minute. See what a beautiful world you're in.

Take your mind off the problems for a moment, and focus on the positive possibilities. Consider how very much you are able to do.


Turn your attention for a while away from the worries and anxieties. Remind yourself of all your many blessings.

The direction of your focus is the direction your life will move. Let yourself move toward what is good, valuable, strong and true.

The things that fill your awareness are the things that will fill your life and your world. So expand your awareness beyond your own concerns and toward the best of what can be.

Look up and look confidently toward the highest vision you can imagine. The moment you do, you're on your way there.


Ralph Marston - The Daily Motivator

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Old Story with Good Lesson




A mouse looked through the crack in the wall to see the farmer and his wife open a package... "What food might this contain?" The mouse wondered - he was devastated to discover it was a mousetrap. 
Retreating to the farmyard, the mouse proclaimed the warning.  "There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!" 

The chicken clucked and scratched, raised her head and said,  "Mr. Mouse, I can tell this is a grave concern to you but it is of no consequence to me. I cannot be bothered by it."
The mouse turned to the goat and told him "There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!"  The goat sympathized, but said, "I am so very sorry, Mr. Mouse, but there is nothing I can do about it. "

The mouse turned to the cow and said, "There is a mousetrap in the house! There is a mousetrap in the house!"  The cow said, "Wow, Mr. Mouse.  I'm sorry for you, but it's no skin off my nose. But wish you well; be assured you are in my prayers "

So, the mouse returned to the house, head down and dejected, to face the farmer's mousetrap-- alone.
That very night a sound was heard throughout the house -- like the sound  of a mousetrap catching its prey. The farmer's wife rushed to see what was  caught.   In the darkness, she did not see it was a venomous snake whose tail the trap had caught.  The snake bit the farmer's wife. 

The farmer rushed her to the hospital  and she returned home with a fever. Everyone knows you treat a fever with fresh chicken soup, so the farmer took his hatchet to the farmyard  for the soup's main ingredient.  But his wife's sickness continued, so friends and neighbors came to sit with her  around the clock. To feed them, the farmer  butchered the goat.  The farmer's wife did not get well; she died. 
So many people came for her funeral, the farmer had the cow slaughtered to provide enough meat  for all of them. The mouse looked upon it all from his crack in 
the wall with great sadness. 

So, the next time you hear someone is facing a problem and think it doesn't concern you, Remember that when one of us is threatened, we are all at risk.  We are all involved in this journey called life. We must keep an eye out for one another  and make an extra effort to encourage one another because directly or indirectly we might have to suffer!!!


 

Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com

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Reason for Divorce :)

A judge was interviewing a woman regarding her pending divorce, and asked, What are the grounds for your divorce?
She replied, About four acres and a nice little home in the middle of the property with a stream running by.


No, he said, I mean what is the foundation of this case?

It is made of concrete, brick and mortar, she responded.

I mean, he continued, What are your relations like?

I have an aunt and uncle living here in town, and so do my husband's parents.

He said, Do you have a real grudge?

No, she replied, We have a two-car carport and have never really needed one.

Please, he tried again, is there any infidelity in your marriage?

Yes, both my son and daughter have stereo sets. We don't necessarily like the music, but the answer to your questions is yes.

Ma'am, does your husband ever beat you up?

Yes, she responded, about twice a week he gets up earlier than I do.

Finally, in frustration, the judge asked, Lady, why do you want a divorce?
Oh, I don't want a divorce, she replied. I've never wanted a divorce. My husband does. He said he can't communicate with me!

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Junaid Tahir 
www.DailyTenMinutes.com

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