6 Thinking Hats Technique for Innovation and Creativity

The six hats represent six modes of thinking and are directions to think rather than labels for thinking. That is, the hats are used proactively rather than reactively.

A summary by Sylvie Labelle
Early in the 1980s Dr. de Bono invented the Six Thinking Hats method. The method is a framework for thinking and can incorporate lateral thinking. Valuable judgmental thinking has its place in the system but is not allowed to dominate as in normal thinking. Dr. de Bono organized a network of authorized trainers to introduce the Six Thinking Hats. Advanced Practical Thinking (APTT), of Des Moines, Iowa USA, licenses the training in all parts of the world except Canada (and now, Europe). APTT organizes the trainers and supplies the only training materials written and authorized by Dr. de Bono.

Organizations such as Prudential Insurance, IBM, Federal Express, British Airways, Polaroid, Pepsico, DuPont, and Nippon Telephone and Telegraph, possibly the world's largest company, use Six Thinking Hats.

The six hats represent six modes of thinking and are directions to think rather than labels for thinking. That is, the hats are used proactively rather than reactively.

The method promotes fuller input from more people. In de Bono's words it "separates ego from performance". Everyone is able to contribute to the exploration without denting egos as they are just using the yellow hat or whatever hat. The six hats system encourages performance rather than ego defense. People can contribute under any hat even though they initially support the opposite view.

The key point is that a hat is a direction to think rather than a label for thinking. The key theoretical reasons to use the Six Thinking Hats are to:
encourage Parallel Thinking
encourage full-spectrum thinking
separate ego from performance

The published book Six Thinking Hats (de Bono, 1985) is readily available and explains the system, although there have been some additions and changes to the execution of the method.


The following is an excerpt from John Culvenor and Dennis Else Engineering Creative Design, 1995)

There are six metaphorical hats and the thinker can put on or take off one of these hats to indicate the type of thinking being used. This putting on and taking off is essential. The hats must never be used to categorize individuals, even though their behavior may seem to invite this. When done in group, everybody wear the same hat at the same time.

 1- White Hat thinking

This covers facts, figures, information needs and gaps. "I think we need some white hat thinking at this point..." means Let's drop the arguments and proposals, and look at the data base."

 2- Red Hat thinking

This covers intuition, feelings and emotions. The red hat allows the thinker to put forward an intuition without any ned to justify it. "Putting on my red hat, I think this is a terrible proposal." Ususally feelings and intuition can only be introduced into a discussion if they are supported by logic. Usually the feeling is genuine but the logic is spurious.The red hat gives full permission to a thinker to put forward his or her feelings on the subject at the moment.

 3- Black Hat thinking

This is the hat of judgment and caution. It is a most valuable hat. It is not in any sense an inferior or negative hat. The rior or negative hat. The black hat is used to point out why a suggestion does not fit the facts, the available experience, the system in use, or the policy that is being followed. The black hat must always be logical.

 4- Yellow Hat thinking

This is the logical positive. Why something will work and why it will offer benefits. It can be used in looking forward to the results of some proposed action, but can also be used to find something of value in what has already happened.

 5- Green Hat thinking

This is the hat of creativity, alternatives, proposals, what is interesting, provocations and changes.

6-Blue Hat thinking

This is the overview or process control hat. It looks not at the subject itself but at the 'thinking' about the subject. "Putting on my blue hat, I feel we should do some more green hat thinking at this point." In technical terms, the blue hat is concerned with meta-cognition.
Source: Unknown

4 Secrets To Get Along With Difficult People

We all have difficult people in our lives. You know—the ones you dread talking to; the ones you try to avoid at all costs. They may be your ex-spouse, a co-worker, or a family member; they may be a bully, a control freak, passive-aggressive or someone who loves to play the role of victim.

So, how do we deal with these people? How can we work together productively, whether in a parenting, a working, or a family relationship?
Here are a few secrets to being able to keep your cool when dealing with that difficult person in your life:

1. Know Your Triggers

Self-knowledge is powerful.
We all have subjects and idiosyncrasies that push our buttons, and I can almost guarantee that the difficult person in your life knows what those are—but do you? Spend some time exploring what really ticks you off. Is it when somebody talks about politics, money, or your family?
Once you have your list of those trigger buttons, you are ready to arm yourself.
Create a plan. What will you do when the conversation steers dangerously close to one of your buttons?
You can practice deep breathing, take a short time-out, walk away from the conversation, or any combination of the three. Whatever allows you to center yourself and regain your focus on the purpose of the conversation will work.

2. The STOP Phrases
If you are having a conversation with a difficult person and you just want it to end, these phrases seem to do the trick (or at least take the wind out of the other person's sails).
"Sorry you feel that way."
"That's your opinion."
"Perhaps you're right."
If you just repeat these phrases over and over during the conversation, eventually the other person will give up trying to get you to join the argument.

3. Resist the Temptation to get Sucked In
Difficult people want to engage you: don't fall for that trap. Listen to what you're saying: are you trying to justify, argue, defend, or explain your position? If you are, stop. If you don't, the conversation will just continue to go around in circles. You will never change the mind of a difficult person—otherwise you probably wouldn't be seeing them as "difficult."

4. The Big One

While the 3 secrets above can help you to avoid or get out of an uncomfortable conversation with a difficult person, there is one secret that can truly change your relationship with that person in your life: that secret is, that they are human, and are dealing with their own issues and their own crap that they're bringing to the table.
Their difficult behaviors are benefiting them in some way that helps them deal with those issues, and most of the time their behavior has nothing to do with you.

A person might feel more secure when they are bullying someone or controlling others, or they might feel a sense of importance when they're getting a lot of attention—even negative attention. They might try to gain a sense of belonging by playing the victim and getting others to help them, or someone who's inflicting hurt and provoking hostility might be trying to protect his own sense of identity.

If we take the time to figure out what unconscious beliefs may be behind someone's difficult behavior, we may be able to change our interaction with them and improve our relationship. Once you figure out what may be driving their behavior, you can begin to try different ways to help them get their emotional needs met without resorting to that behavior any longer.
The main idea here is to tap into your empathy pool and realize that the person you see as the bane of your existence is just another human being trying to get along as best they can.

A Final Thought
Yes, sometimes we have to disengage in order to save our sanity, but keep in mind that everybody is doing the best they can with the emotional tools they have at their disposal. It is possible to get past our reactions to their difficult behaviors so that we may be able to do our part in building a calmer, more productive relationship, and in the end, this is all we can truly control—our own reactions.

You never know—one day, you may actually look forward to seeing these people.
source: Lifehacker

Message of the Day

Always Welcome Your Problems,
Because Problems Gives You Dual Advice,
Firstly, You Can Know How To Solve Them,
Secondly, You Learn How To Avoid Them In Future

The 8 "L's" of Parenting

By Leah Davies, M.Ed.

  1. LOVE your child. For your child to be successful, he or she must feel valued. Your gentle touches, smiles and hugs communicate love. Giving your undivided attention, especially at the end of each day, demonstrates caring.
  2. LOOK for the good in your child and make specific comments on what he or she does well. You must believe in your child's worth before he or she can believe it. If you want your child to have self-confidence and motivation, watch for positive behaviors and comment on them.
  3. LISTEN, without judgment, to your child express his or her thoughts and feelings. If you do not listen, your child may attempt to gain your attention by misbehaving.
  4. LAUGH with your child, not at him or her. Demonstrate a sense of humor as you cope with life's difficulties. Laugh and play together.
  5. LABOR diligently and with pride so that your child will want to work hard, persevere and do his or her best.
  6. LEARN new information. It is fine to say, I don't know, but then add that you both can find out together. Take the time to read and thus instill a love of learning. On car trips play word games, read or listen to books on tape.
  7. LEAVE the television and other media off. Many programs and video games desensitize your child towards violence and contribute to fearfulness and aggression. Place computers in central locations to monitor internet use.
  8. LIVE life to its fullest. Take pleasure in little things like an ice cream cone, a beautiful day or the enthusiasm of your child. Read, pretend, take walks, play games, have pleasant meals, share dreams, and enjoy each other.
Remember: Your child will most likely adopt the attitudes and habits you demonstrate daily.  Used by permission of the author, Leah Davies, and selected from the Kelly Bear website [www.kellybear.com]

7 Cs of Success

by Brian Tracy

Clarity: Eighty percent of success comes from being clear on who you are, what you believe in and what you want.

Competence: You can't climb to the next rung on the ladder until you are excellent at what you do now.

Eighty percent of all obstacles to success come from within. Find out what is constraining in you or your company and deal with it.

The ability to focus on one thing single-mindedly and see it through until it's done takes more character than anything else.

Flood your life with ideas from many sources. Creativity needs to be exercised like a muscle; if you don't use it you'll lose it.

Most in demand and least in supply, courage is the willingness to do the things you know are right.

Continuous learning:
Read, at the very least, one book a week on business to keep you miles ahead of the competition. And just as you eat and bathe, organize your time so you spend 30 minutes a day exploring email, sending messages, going through websites, because like exercise, it's the only way you can keep on top of technology. If you get away from it, you'll lose your edge.

Introduction to Six Sigma



Six Sigma is a set of tools and techniques for process improvement. This standard was established by Motorola 1985 and over the years it has gained humongous esteem by thousands of companies all over the world.

6 sigma compliant companies ensure that there are only 3.4 defects for each one million chances/events/opportunities availed. The other sigma values are:


·         2 sigma = 308,537

·         3 sigma = 67,000

·         4 sigma = 6,200

·         5 sigma = 233

·         6 sigma = 3.4


In its basic strategy, the Six Sigma system requires the project be put through an entire process called DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyse, Improve, & Control).


To elaborate more:

D Define the problem or the opportunity which needs improvement.

M Measure the current process performance.

A Analyse the process to determine the root causes of poor performance; See how the process can be improved, edited, enhanced.

I Improve the process by attacking root causes.

C Control the Improved process by locking it to ensure stability.


The Tools


Central Six Sigma process and acronym to ensure you remember it: Define, Measure, Analyse Improve, Control, more recently extended to DMAICT by others in the Six Sigma consulting and training communities, to Transfer (transfer best practice and thereby share learning).


An alternative/substitute abbreviation to DFSS (Design For Six Sigma), and like DFSS DMADV is central to Six Sigma initiatives. DMADV more specifically describes a method comprising linked steps; Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, Verify, for ensuring that products and processes are designed at the outset to meet Six Sigma requirements.


Categories of Belts


Green Belt:
Green Belts use basic analytical tools. They work on less complex projects


Black Belt:

Black Belts emphasise on applications and analysis. Works on projects with help from Green belts


Master Black Belt:

Master Black Belts understand applications and statistical theory behind applications. They train other belts and leads projects reviews.


Differences Between Six Sigma Black Belts and Green Belts

The process of Six Sigma clearly identifies important roles in any project’s success. Champions and Master Black Belts may often be the instigators of Six Sigma projects, however the implementation and success of each individual project is largely down to the work of Six Sigma Black Belts and Green Belts.

Six Sigma Black Belts

A Black Belt is a full-time change agent within the organisation. With a demonstrated mastery of Six Sigma concepts and tools, as well as a proficiency in achieving results via the Six Sigma processes, Black Belt’s are tasked with delivering high impact projects that help the organisation achieve its overall strategic objectives.

The role of Six Sigma Black Belt is best described as project management, incorporating leadership, analytical and coaching skills. Specific duties may include acting as a Six Sigma technical expert (a reference for Green Belts and team members) as well as acting as a coach and mentor to Green Belts within the team. Black Belts will often recommend high performing Green Belts for certification.

In practical terms, Six Sigma Black Belts will normally perform a ‘tour of duty’ of between 18 and two years as Black Belts within an organisation, executing numerous high value projects each year. Often viewed as a stepping stone to promotion within an organisation, effective Black Belt training is essential to the Six Sigma process.

Indeed, Black Belts are so central to the execution and delivery of Six Sigma projects that Black Belt training is often the first step for companies implementing the Six Sigma process.

Six Sigma Green Belts

The most obvious and fundamental difference between Six Sigma Black Belts and Six Sigma Green Belts is that the latter still maintain their normal job duties within the organisation.

Six Sigma Green Belts still require a high level of training and will be expected to demonstrate their proficiency in delivering Six Sigma projects – indeed Six Sigma Green Belt training often produces Green Belts who are trained to much the same standard as Black Belts.

Depending on the structure of the organisation Green Belts will serve as either part time team leaders – specifically as part of local Six Sigma projects – or part time team members. As they retain their normal duties as well, it is hoped that Green Belts will also be in a position to bring elements of their Six Sigma training into the everyday activities of the organisation as well.

In particular a Six Sigma Green Belt may be expected to:

• Recommend Six Sigma projects based on their own areas of expertise
• Act as Six Sigma champions in their local area or area of expertise
• Occasionally lead Six Sigma teams in local projects
• Teach and share their knowledge of Six Sigma tools and methodologies with project team members and co-workers
• Complete at least one Six Sigma project every six months

Again, effective Six Sigma training is at the heart of the process. Six Sigma Green Belts and Black Belts are the core of the Six Sigma process are their knowledge of the tools, skills and concepts of Six Sigma can make or break the success of the process.

Not only do smart organisations recognise this and invest in Six Sigma training (GE notably requires a large proportion of its employees to undertake Green Belt training) but increasingly, ambitious individuals are adding Six Sigma certification to their own CVs.

Source: Unknown

Story: The Mother, The Son and Fan

After his  Father's death Son decides to leave mom to old age home.
Would visit her on and off..
Once son receives call from old age home....   
Mom very serious ...
please come to visit ..
Son comes and see mom very critical. .  Dying..
Asks mom what can I do for  you...Mom replies....
Please install fans in the old age home ....there are none...
Son, surprised ..questions....
All this while you were here you never complained
Now you have few hours left you are  saying .....

Mom says .....   it's ok , I've managed with the heat.....
But when  your children will send you here, I am afraid you will not be able to manage ....
Take care of your parents today before its too late !!!

10 Tips to Effectively Manage Your Emails and Tasks in OutLook

Are you one of those who receive hundreds of emails and having trouble to manage? Here are some recommendations which should help:

1-    Guide your teams/colleagues on where to include you in cc and where not to. This will reduce email flooding. For example, if you are a manager, you are not supposed to be copied in all minor correspondences.

2-   Develop the habit of fast reading.

Set reminders: As soon as you send an email for a specific task, go to your 'Sent' items and set a reminder for follow up. You can use a Label (in case you are using Gmail email service). Alternately, Google Calendar is very good service which sends you reminder via email and sms for important tasks. You can use it for personal tasks as well.

Important emails should be read twice or sometimes more than that. You can use a separate folder for important emails so you can have a look at this folder once a day or may be twice. 

One of the best ways to manage email is to avoid email J what I mean here is to pick up the phone, talk to the person and try to resolve the case. I have noticed that a lot of email correspondence happens for clarification of things which waste a lot of time. So use the phone or intercom to save your time. Encourage others for the same.

You might be receiving so many emails from specific mailing groups which you might have subscribed in the past but don't really need these emails any more. Unsubscribe.

While sending emails think from other's perspective and write a mature and to-the-point email. This will ensure reducing multiple correspondence for clarifications of things.

Indexing is helpful while searching for old emails. Google desktop is my favorite.  

If you are using MS Outlook, Set rules for sorting the incoming emails. If you are using Gmail, use Filters.

If you are member of Google & Yahoo Groups and receive several emails daily then consider switching to 'Digest emails'. You will receive one email daily which will contain the links to all the emails of that day. You can quickly look at the headings of all emails and click on the email which you want to read.

In the end I would suggest developing analytical skills so not only you can effectively manage your life but sort out your emails and reduce the unnecessary fats from your inbox.