Blog Archive

5 Qualities of Remarkable Bosses



Consistently do these five things and the results you want from your employees--and your business--will follow.
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Remarkable bosses aren't great on paper. Great bosses are remarkable based on their actions.

Results are everything—but not the results you might think.

Consistently do these five things and everything else follows. You and your business benefit greatly.
More importantly, so do your employees.

1. Develop every employee.
Sure, you can put your primary focus on reaching targets, achieving results, and accomplishing concrete goals—but do that and you put your leadership cart before your achievement horse.

Without great employees, no amount of focus on goals and targets will ever pay off. Employees can only achieve what they are capable of achieving, so it's your job to help all your employees be more capable so they—and your business—can achieve more.

It's your job to provide the
training, mentoring, and opportunities your employees need and deserve. When you do, you transform the relatively boring process of reviewing results and tracking performance into something a lot more meaningful for your employees: Progress, improvement, and personal achievement.

So don't worry about reaching performance goals. Spend the bulk of your time developing the skills of your employees and achieving goals will be a natural outcome.

Plus it's a lot more fun.

2. Deal with problems immediately.
Nothing kills team morale more quickly than problems that don't get addressed. Interpersonal squabbles, performance issues, feuds between departments... all negatively impact employee motivation and enthusiasm.


And they're distracting, because small problems never go away. Small problems always fester and grow into bigger problems. Plus, when you ignore a problem your employees immediately lose respect for you, and without respect, you can't lead.


Never hope a problem will magically go away, or that someone else will deal with it. Deal with every issue head-on, no matter how small.


3. Rescue your worst employee
. Almost every business has at least one employee who has fallen out of grace: Publicly failed to complete a task, lost his cool in a meeting, or just can't seem to keep up. Over time that employee comes to be seen by his peers—and by you—as a weak link.

While that employee may desperately want to "rehabilitate" himself, it's almost impossible. The weight of team disapproval is too heavy for one person to move.

But it's not too heavy for you.


Before you
remove your weak link from the chain, put your full effort into trying to rescue that person instead. Say, "John, I know you've been struggling but I also know you're trying. Let's find ways together that can get you where you need to be." Express confidence. Be reassuring. Most of all, tell him you'll be there every step of the way.
Don't relax your standards. Just step up the mentoring and coaching you provide.

If that seems like too much work for too little potential outcome, think of it this way. Your remarkable employees don't need a lot of your time;
they're remarkable because they already have these qualities. If you're lucky, you can get a few percentage points of extra performance from them. But a struggling employee has tons of upside; rescue him and you make a tremendous difference. Granted, sometimes it won't work out. When it doesn't, don't worry about it.  The effort is its own reward.
And occasionally an employee will succeed—and you will have made a tremendous difference in a person's professional and personal life.
Can't beat that.

4. Serve others, not yourself. You can get away with being selfish or self-serving once or twice... but that's it.
Never say or do anything that in any way puts you in the spotlight, however briefly. Never congratulate employees and digress for a few moments to discuss what you did.

If it should go without saying, don't say it. Your glory should always be reflected, never direct.


When employees excel, you and your business excel. When your team succeeds, you and your business succeed. When you rescue a struggling employee and they become remarkable, remember they should be congratulated, not you.


You were just doing your job the way a remarkable boss should.

When you consistently act as if you are less important than your employees—and when you never ask employees to do something you don't do—everyone knows how important you really are.

5. Always remember where you came from.
See an
autograph seeker blown off by a famous athlete and you might think, "If I was in a similar position I would never do that."

Oops. Actually, you do. To some of your employees, especially new employees, you are at least slightly famous. You're in charge. You're the boss.

That's why an employee who wants to talk about something that seems inconsequential may just want to spend a few moments with you.
When that happens, you have a choice. You can blow the employee off... or you can see the moment for its true importance: A chance to inspire, reassure, motivate, and even give someone hope for greater things in their life. The higher you rise the greater the impact you can make—and the greater your responsibility to make that impact.

In the eyes of his or her employees, a remarkable boss is a star.

Remember where you came from, and be gracious with your stardom.
Jeff Haden learned much of what he knows about business and technology as he worked his way up in the manufacturing industry. Everything else he picks up from ghostwriting books for some of the smartest leaders he knows in business. @jeff_haden

9 Tips To Make Effective Decisions








By Junaid Tahir

Its true that you are the product of your own thoughts and decisions. Whatever you decide on daily basis, whatever you do in your routine life is directly or indirectly linked to your future. That means you are making the foundation of your destiny with your decision and actions in your routine life. So by looking at the bigger picture, it is right to conclude that decision making is critically important for your success and achievements of lifetime goals.  

Given below is the list of insightful factors which you need to considere while making decisions.  Article written by Junaid.Tahir

1.     Consider the short term and long term consequences: Whether the decision is materialistic or a sensitive family matter.  You have to consider short terms and long terms benefits.

2.    Cost Vs quality if applicable. If you intend to purchase something, consider cost, quality, warranty perspectives. Usually cheep products have less life and bad quality but is not the case always. To cope up with this, define your budget and then carefully analyze all the options which are falling within your budget.
3.    Need Vs wants analysis: Are you purchasing for pleasure or it is your long term need. Remember this is a difference between pleasure and happiness. Sometimes pleasure dost not last long so you don't want to spend a lot for the sake of short time pleasure. If you are in Need of something then consider point-1 and point-2. Article written by Junaid.Tahir
4.    Consider emotions: This is quite sensitive aspect. You have to put yourself in everyone's shoes to understand his/her emotions. You don't want to hurt someone with your decision,  instead you want to keep your stake holders emotionally satisfied. Emotional Intelligence is an art; learn it by reading on internet. To understand people you have to have true sense of judging people
5.    Consider Win-Win:  A balanced approach in which everyone gains is always recommended.  
6.    Consider all options: Don't stop your brain on one idea or approach. Think about more options. Seek advice from others on different possible solutions of the given situation/problem. to the problems which need decisions.
7.    Ask for criticism: If possible ask for criticism before implementing the decision. Although it's never too late to ask for criticism even after your decision. Feedback always helps in your future.
8.    Learn to differentiate between Urgent and Important tasks. Read my article Urgent and Important.
9.    Closely observe others: Think about what your friend/colleague/acquaintance did under a specific condition. A wise man always learns from the mistakes of others. Article written by Junaid.Tahir

Good decisions require good analytical skills. Read some tips here to improve your analytical skills.

Junaid Tahir, a telecom engineer and a blogger, writes articles on wisdom, happiness and stress management at his personal blog. His personal Google Group can be joined here. He is reachable at mjunaidtahir@gmail.com for any kind of suggestions and comments



How to Keep People Happy? 
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6 Tips For Resolving Conflicts
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Do I Treat People Fairly?
Do I have these 7 Qualities of Highly Ethical People?

A Nurse Reveals the Top 5 Regrets People Make




 
 A Nurse reveals the top 5 regrets people make on their deathbed

 

I learned never to underestimate someones capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger,
remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them.

When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced agaand again. Here are the most common five:

 

1. I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.
This was the most common regret of all. When people realize that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honoured even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made.
It is very important to try and honour at least some of your dreams along the way. From the moment that you lose your health, it is too late. Health brings a freedom very few realise, until they no longer have it.

 


2. I wish I didn't work so hard.This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children's youth and their partners companionship. Women also spoke of this regret. But as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence.

By simplifying your lifestyle and making conscious choices along the way, it is possible to not need the income that you think you do. And by creating more space in your life, you become happier and more open to new opportunities, ones more suited to your new lifestyle.

 

3. I wish I'd had the courage to express my feelings.Many people suppressed their feelings in order to keep peace with others. As a result, they settled for a mediocre existence and never became who they were truly capable of becoming. Many developed illnesses relating to the bitterness and resentment they carried as a result.
We cannot control the reactions of others. However, although people may initially react when you change the way you are by speaking honestly, in the end it raises the relationship to a whole new and healthier level. Either that or it releases the unhealthy relationship from your life. Either way, you win.

 

4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.Often they would not truly realise the full benefits of old friends until their dying weeks and it was not always possible to track them down. Many had become so caught up in their own lives that they had let golden friendships slip by over the years. There were many deep regrets about not giving friendships the time and effort that they deserved. Everyone misses their friends when they are dying.
It is common for anyone in a busy lifestyle to let friendships slip. But when you are faced with your approaching death, the physical details of life fall away. People do want to get their financial affairs in order if possible. But it is not money or status that holds the true importance for them. They want to get things in order more for the benefit of those they love. Usually though, they are too ill and weary to ever manage this task. It is all comes down to love and relationships in the end. That is all that remains in the final weeks, love and relationships.

 
5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
This is a surprisingly common one. Many did not realize until the end that happiness is a choice. They had stayed stuck in old patterns and habits. The so-called comfort of familiarity overflowed into their emotions, as well as their physical lives. Fear of change had them pretending to others, and to their selves, that they were content. When deep within, they longed to laugh properly and have silliness in their life again. When you are on your deathbed, what others think of you is a long way from your mind. How wonderful to be able to let go and smile again, long before you are dying.

Life is a choice. It is YOUR life. Choose consciously, choose wisely, choose honestly. Choose happiness.

Story: The Woman and the Parrot


The story is told of a woman who bought a parrot to keep her company, but she returned it the next day

.


"This bird doesn't talk," she told the owner. "Does he have a mirror in his cage?" he asked.
"Parrots love mirrors. They see their reflection and start a conversation."
The woman bought a mirror and left.
The next day she returned; the bird still wasn't talking.
"How about a ladder? Parrots love ladders.
The happy parrot is a talkative parrot." The woman bought a ladder and left.
But the next day, she was back. "Does your parrot have a swing?
No? Well, that's the problem.
Once he starts swinging, he'll talk up a storm."
The woman reluctantly bought a swing and left.
When she walked into the store the next day, her countenance had changed.
"The parrot died," she said. The pet store owner was shocked.
"I'm so sorry. Tell me, did he ever say anything?" he asked.

"Yes, right before he died," the woman replied.
"In a weak voice, he asked me, 'Don't they sell any food at that pet store?'"

Sometimes we forget what's really important in life.
We get so caught up in things that are good while neglecting the things that are truly necessary.
We've got to provide the family with a nice house.
And of course, we've got to have at least two cars.
And to make everybody truly happy, we need the latest smart phone.
But, if we're not careful, we'll make the mistake of thinking those (and many other such "things")
are the things that bring us satisfaction and meaning.



Story – The Two brothers - Concluding Good and Bad
Story - The Green Concept
Story - Pick Up in the rain
Story – The Gold Coins - The 99 Club
Story – The Soap Box
Story - The Touching Farewell 
Story - Borrowing the Pen 
Story - The Golden Gift
Story - 500 Baloons
Story - Good People Bad People  


The internet is controlled by 14 people

ICANN Key Ceremony

This sounds like something out of a Dan Brown book, but it isn't: The whole internet is controlled by seven actual, physical keys.
The Guardian's James Ball was recently allowed to observe the highly secure ritual known as a key ceremony.
The people conducting the ceremony are part of an organization called the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). ICANN is responsible for assigning numerical internet addresses to websites and computers and translating them into the normal web addresses that people type into their browsers.
For instance, type 64.27.101.155 into your browser, and you'll be taken to Business Insider's web page. But www.businessinsider.com is easier for people to remember. ICANN maps the numbers (easier for computers to use) with words (easier for humans to use).
If someone were to gain control of ICANN's database, that person would control the internet. For instance, the person could send people to fake bank websites instead of real bank websites.
On the other hand, if a calamity happened, the ICANN database could need to be rebuilt. So ICANN came up with a way to do that without entrusting too much control to any one person. It selected seven people as key holders and gave each one an actual key to internet. It selected seven more people to be backup key holders: 14 people in all.
The physical keys unlock safe deposit boxes stashed around the world. Inside those boxes are smart key cards. Put the seven smartcards together and you have the "master key." The master key is really some computer code, a password of sorts that can access the ICANN database.
Four times a year since 2010 the seven key holders meet for the key ceremony where they generate a new master key, i.e. a new password.
The security to be admitted to the ceremony is intense, Ball reports, and involves passing through a series of locked doors using key codes and hand scanners, until entering a room so secure that no electronic communications can escape it.
The group conducts the ritual, then each person files out of the room one by one, and then they all head to a restaurant and party.
Here's Ball's detailed account of the ceremony that most recently occurred.
Here's a video of the very first key ceremony conducted in 2010. Skip to 1:58 to see the ceremony.







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Some Selective Quotes

10 Tips to Manage Emails Effectively




Are you one of those who receive hundreds of emails daily and having trouble to manage? Here are some recommendations which should help:

1-    Guide your teams/colleagues on where to include you in cc and where not to. This will reduce email flooding. For example, if you are a manager, you are not supposed to be copied in all minor correspondences.
2-   Develop the habit of fast reading.

3-   Set reminders: As soon as you send an email for a specific task, go to your 'Sent' items and set a reminder for follow up. You can use a Label (in case you are using Gmail email service). Alternately, Google Calendar is very good service which sends you reminder via email and sms for important tasks. You can use it for personal tasks as well. artilce written by Junaid.Tahir
4-   Important emails should be read twice or sometimes more than that. You can use a separate folder for important emails so you can have a look at this folder once a day or may be twice. A suggestion is to Differentiate between Urgent and Important tasks.
5-   One of the best ways to manage email is to avoid email J what I mean here is to pick up the phone, talk to the person and try to resolve the case. I have noticed that a lot of email correspondence happens for clarification of things which waste a lot of time. So use the phone or intercom to save your time. Encourage others for the same.
6-   You might be receiving so many emails from specific mailing groups which you might have subscribed in the past but don't really need these emails any more. Unsubscribe. Artilce written by Junaid.Tahir
7-   While sending emails think from other's perspective and write a mature and to-the-point email. This will ensure reducing multiple correspondence for clarifications of things.
8-   Indexing is helpful while searching for old emails. Google desktop is my favorite.  
9-   If you are using MS Outlook, Set rules for sorting the incoming emails. If you are using Gmail, use Filters.
10- If you are member of Google & Yahoo Groups and receive several emails daily then consider switching to 'Digest emails'. You will receive one email daily which will contain the links to all the emails of that day. You can quickly look at the headings of all emails and click on the email which you want to read.

In the end I would suggest developing analytical skills so not only you can effectively manage your life but sort out your emails and reduce the unnecessary fats from your inbox.

10 Most Common Regrets in Life



The life we live is the legacy we leave behind. Everyday counts for something, and every relationship has meaning. No one wants to live in mediocrity, with their dreams and aspirations deteriorating behind the fa├žade of a day to day rat race. At the end of life, many people express regrets, wishing for a second chance to get it right. In reality, there is no second chance; we have to get it right the first time. These are the top ten regrets most likely to change the course of someone's life.

1. Never Resolving a Conflict

The number one regret a person can have is not resolving a conflict. Countless funerals are full of regretful friends and family that never got the chance to right a wrong. Bitterness can sour a lifetime of memories, wedging itself in between relationships and people that love each other. Don't let anger last a lifetime.

2. Not Spending Enough Family Time

For many people sending their kids off to college, or watching them get married can conjure thoughts of times growing up as a young family. Often work can come in the way of family time, resulting in distance between husbands, wives and children. Inserting a family day into a weekly schedule and making time for family vacations each year can prevent a person from having such a strong regret.

3. Not Landing a Dream Job

Going to college for years and getting a degree leads a person to begin seeking work in the field of their dreams. However, often employers are not hiring in limited fields, leaving post grads to find work in other occupations. What starts out as temporary can become permanent, with salaries and benefits luring employees into a lifelong commitment to a single company. While the money may be great, a job can feel like a rut if it isn't the job you longed for.

4. Not Saving Enough Money

For many people in their twenties or thirties, retirement seems like a distant future, not an impending reality. They may choose to defer retirement savings into other purchases for immediate gratification. This can turn into a disaster during the golden years, when money can often be tight. This is an easy regret to avoid by setting up automated investments into an IRA throughout the working years.

5. Not Having Children

Children are often viewed as distractions or inconveniences, getting in the way of careers and personal goals. Though it may seem like a good idea to not have kids, the choice can leave a person very lonely as they begin to age. It is a natural human desire to wish to leave a heritage with descendents, so be careful in choosing to put off having children.

6. Never Taking up a Sport or Hobby

Countless little boys spend their youth community sports, dreaming of one day playing for a professional league. Though not everyone has what it takes to be a professional, there are other ways to incorporate a passion for sports or other hobbies such as learning to play an instrument, or taking on a second language.

7. Never Telling Someone You Love Them

There is nothing like going to the grave, remembering "the one that got away." Sometimes it can be hard to express true feelings for someone if the outcome could mean rejection. However, holding it all inside will leave heart aching for closure. It is better to share your heart with a loved one, rather than miss out on a chance at happiness.

8. Never Traveling

Growing up, most people dream of visiting an exotic island, backpacking through Europe, experiencing the Great Wall of China, or finding love in the city of Paris. Travel is a healthy ambition that creates memories to last a lifetime. Failing to travel to a dream destination can leave a lifetime of regrets. Don't let financial circumstances or life events keep you from visiting the places that you love.

9. Never Getting a Degree

A small percentage of people successfully graduate high school, go to college, and acquire the degree that they set out for. Life circumstances can get in the way, with some students quitting college to get married, have children or go to work, never returning to school. For people who take pride in education and intelligence, having a degree is proof of their capabilities and accomplishment. It is never too late to go back to school and get the degree you always wanted.

10. Never Buying the dream home

Everyone has an idea of the perfect home in the perfect location. Maybe it's a luxurious Manhattan apartment full of chic and modern furnishings. Or perhaps it's a three story beach house overlooking the Pacific with a mountainous backdrop and scenic views. Settling for a suburban track home may be less than the expectations of an average American. One of the biggest regrets a person can have is not raising a family in the dream location they once desired
connectingsingles

Before You Respond to that Email, Pause



Someone sends you an email message or a text, and you’re unsure how to respond.  It’s about a complex negotiation, or a politically sensitive situation. Or maybe it’s just from a person who unnerves you.
For a moment, you pause. But for most of us, most of the time, that pause doesn’t last long. Instead we react, feeling the need to immediately craft a response. And often we then hit “send” without fully thinking. The result: an awkward or incomplete message that causes the recipient to pause, then react, often starting or continuing a cycle of miscommunication and misunderstanding.

Yes, people today expect and want an instantaneous reply to any message. We often accommodate them because delay feels like a violation of modern-day social norms.

But there are many times when we should not immediately reply.  And the truth is, we usually know them when they come. That’s what that initial pause is about. The key is to heed it.

There is a simple two-step method to making the pause work for you. First, buy yourself some time to think. Second, follow the four simple C’s of effective communication that help determine how best to respond in terms of the context, content, channel, and contact.




Buying Time

There are a few practical ways to buy some time when you get a message where your gut tells you not to respond or where you are not sure how to respond.
  • The non-response response “Got your message.”  This is meant to serve as an acknowledgement but really is only filler. It may aggravate someone in the midst of a negotiation or other serious exchange.
  • The expectation-setter “Got it.  Lot on the plate today, I’ll get back to you tomorrow afternoon.”  This is often a good middle ground.  It provides an immediate response of acknowledgment and resets the timetable.
  • The confident pauseDon’t respond. Really. Just don’t. Pausing for at least 24 hours is a pretty good rule of thumb. Not responding is its own kind of response, which can often work to your advantage.
Once you’ve bought yourself some time, you soak in the information from the message and think of what the best response might be. There are four C’s that have served as a useful checklist for me to use during that pause time before I respond to a difficult message: context, content, contact, and channel.
The Four C’s of Effective Communication
  1. Context – Having the right situational context is key. Who are the relevant parties to the conversation or discussion thread? Are there relationships and inter-dependencies and previous conversations that I’m not aware of?  Do I fully understand what is at stake?  In the multi-party transactions in which we often get involved in venture capital, sending out a quick response to even a simple query can backfire if the timing is wrong or the information out of date. Sometimes you can even answer a specific question in a technically correct manner, but be practically incorrect because you’ve failed to appreciate the bigger picture.
  2. Content – The message needs to be delivered in clear manner with the right tone and style for the occasion. Having the right content means checking facts and being consistent with past discussion threads. If there is one thing that I have seen kill a negotiation or productive progress in a discussion, it is inconsistency of message, which both confuses others and diminishes your credibility. Get the facts and your message points straight in your head, then focus on delivering them in the clearest, most understandable, most consistent manner possible.
  3. Contact – Are you even the right person to respond? It happens often: we are asked something and fail to realize that we might not be the best person to respond. Consider if someone else might be more knowledgeable or better suited in style to respond, especially in a crisis (where it is usually best to have only a single point of contact). There is a reason why terrorist and hostage negotiations are not conducted over Google Docs. And even in an open and collaborative everyday work culture, there are many times when deferring to someone else is the right answer.  Also, consider if the person on the other side who is asking a question or provoking a discussion is the right contact person as well. And always — always! — be wary of “reply all” and judicious with the cc function.
  4. Channel – Just because someone contacts you by email or text does not mean you have to respond by that channel. Email and text lend themselves to misinterpretation and misunderstanding. They are often likelier to prolong or inflame a debate than to resolve it. As I’ve written before, sometimes it’s much more effective and efficient just to pick up the phone or meet up in person. Email is great for transmitting factual information — a spreadsheet of a business model, for example, or a summary of a prior discussion. But when there are issues to resolve, talking usually works better.
As the pressure grows to respond quickly, the value of pausing and thinking is growing too. We all should work toward developing better, saner norms of communication amid the explosion of channels available to us. But that will take time and thought to get right.  In the interim, we just need to stop being so damned trigger-happy with that send button.

I Need To Tell You Something




I need to tell you something. I hope you don't mind. You see, what I have to tell you might not be something you want to know. But here goes, "You are not always right." This is my polite way of telling you that sometimes you are wrong.

It's OK. Believe it or not, we all are wrong about something. We are wrong regularly and repeatedly. It is the nature of who we are. I am not asking you to dwell on when you are wrong or what it is you are wrong about. I ask you to consider how are you wrong? Translation, when you are wrong about something, how do you behave and how does this impact your team?

Perhaps you do this because you come from a culture where admitting an error is a sign of weakness or you are afraid of losing face. When you are wrong and you hide it, you are teaching your team to engage in the same behavior. This makes it very difficult to proactively solve issues

When you try to cover up the fact that you are wrong about something you damage your integrity. 

When you look for someone else to blame, you are hiding the fact that you are wrong PLUS telling a lie about someone else. This is even worse for your integrity and your credibility. Now you are teaching your team to use other team members as human shields. This makes it very difficult to build any kind of high performing team.
When you are wrong and you admit it, you model responsibility and integrity for your team. You can proactively address issues, you can demonstrate how to behave like an adult professional and you can all move forward.
So here goes, "You are not always right." This is my polite way of telling you that sometimes you are wrong. It's OK. Believe it or not, we all are wrong about something
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