Blog Archive

The Mother - A good read for everyone !

 
There were days when My home used to be filled with laughter, arguments, fights, jokes and loads of mischief.
Books used to be strewn all over the show. Pens and books all over, and clothes messing the rooms, thrown on the beds.
I used to shout at them to tidy up their mess.

In the morning:

One will wake up and say:
Mama I can't find a certain book.
And the other will say: I can't find my perfume,
And one will say: Mama where's my homework.

And will say: Mama I forgot to complete my homework.

Everyone used to ask about their lost possessions.

And I will say, but take care of your stuff, be responsible, you have to grow up.

And today I stand at the doorway of the room.

The beds are empty.
All the cupboards have only a few pieces of clothes in them.

And what remains is the smell of perfume that lingers in the air.
Everyone had a special smell.
So I take in the smell of their perfume for maybe it will fill the empty ache in my heart.
All I have now is the memory of their laughs and their mischief and their warm hugs.

Today my house is clean and organized and everything is in its place, and it is calm and peaceful.
But it is like a desert with no life in it. Do not become angry with your kids about the mess.

Every time they come to visit and they spend time with us, when they are ready to leave. They pull their bags and it is as if they tug my heart along with it.

They close the door behind them and then I stand still and think of the many times I shouted them to close the doors. 

Here I am today, closing my own doors. Nobody opens it besides me. Each one gone to a different city or a different country. 
A left to find their own path in life. They have grown up and I wished that they could stay with me forever.

Oh! God, Take care of them all other children wherever they may be , for you are their guide and their protector and always keep them happy.

A MOTHER

Dedicated to all mothers and their children.

10 Important Mantras for the Golden Aged!

Many people feel unhappy, health-wise and security-wise, after 60 or 70 or 80 years of age, feeling as if a diminishing importance is given to them and their opinions. But, it need not be so, if only we understand the basic principles of life and follow them.
Here are ten mantras to age gracefully, make life after retirement more pleasant, enjoy and treasure the elder years of wisdom and intelligence at its best.

1. Never say 'I am too old'
There are three ages, chronological, biological, and psychological. The first is calculated based on our date of birth; the second is determined by the health conditions and the third is how old you feel you are. While we don't have control over the first, we can take care of our health with good diet, exercise and a cheerful attitude. A positive attitude and optimistic thinking can reverse the third age.

2. Health is wealth
If you really love your kids and kin, taking care of yourself and your health should be your priority. Thus, you will not be a burden to them. Have an annual health check-up and take the prescribed medicines regularly. Take out a health care insurance coverage.

3. Money is important
Money is essential for meeting the basic necessities of life, keeping good health and earning family respect and security. Don't spend beyond your means even for your children. You have lived for them through out, and it is time you enjoyed a harmonious life with your spouse. If your children are grateful they should take care of you. But never take it for granted.
 

4. Relaxation and recreation
The most relaxing and recreating forces are healthy and religious attitudes, good sleep, music and laughter. Have faith in your religion, learn to sleep well, love good music, and see the fun side of life.

5. Time is precious
It is almost like holding a horse's reins. When they are in your hands, you can control them. Imagine that every day you are born again. Yesterday is a paid cheque. Tomorrow is a promissory note. "Today is ready cash; use it profitably. Live this moment".

6. Change is the only permanent thing
We should accept change ; it is inevitable. The only way to make sense out of change is to join the dance. Change has brought about many pleasant things. We should be happy that our children are blessed.

7. Enlightened selfishness
All of us are basically selfish. Whatever we do, we expect something in return. We should definitely be grateful to those who stood by us. But, our focus should be on the internal satisfaction and happiness we derive by doing good to others, without expecting anything in return but the warm glow we get, which in the end, is what we really want.

8. Forgive, then Forget.
Don't be bothered too much about others' mistakes. We are not spiritual enough to show our other cheek when we are slapped on one cheek. But, for the sake of our own health and happiness, let us forgive and forget them. Otherwise, we will only be increasing our BP.

9. Everything has a reason; a purpose
Take life as it comes. Accept yourself as you are, and also accept others for what they are. Everybody is unique and right in their own ways.

10. Overcome the fear of death
We all know that one day we have to leave this world. Still we are afraid of death. We think that our spouse and children will be unable to withstand our loss. But the truth is that no one is going to die for you; they may be depressed for some time. Time heals everything and they will carry on. Remember, no one leaves this world alive.

Negative Control And Domination In Relationships



In a lot many of the different types of relationships we find ourselves in, may they be our personal relationships or at the workplace, we sometimes feel ourselves to be in a position where we feel we are being dominated and controlled negatively by the opposite person. A very common example of the above negative energy, in personal and non-personal relationships, is when someone gets angry with you and manages to make you react and get upset, they manage to dominate you. Over a period of time they start realizing that they possess an invisible and powerful remote control, using which, whenever they want to control you, what they should do is to get angry with you and that way they will achieve the desired control. Their anger becomes a remote control. When you react you are allowing this control or allowing the other's remote control to work. It is you that chooses to allow yourself to be influenced and dominated. It is important for us to realize that we can choose and take the decision to allow ourselves to be controlled and dominated, or we can choose to express what we feel without being affected by the reaction of the other and still maintaining our love, respect and good wishes for the other.





Let us not allow ourselves to be dominated and influenced by entities external to us which includes objects and people or we will lose energy. Each moment we allow another person's remote control to work successfully or we allow an object to control and dominate our emotional state, we weaken internally. We become like a puppet in the other person's hands. A puppet is never powerful because it does not act on its own but is controlled by someone else. We need to prevent that, if we want to conserve our energy and remain spiritually strong. Meditation and spiritual knowledge both increase our spiritual strength and also increase our self-esteem or self-respect over a period of time. Both these increases help us remain in self-control and not only disallow the other's remote control to work but also become assertive (not aggressive) and take a stand when required.

Motivating the Unmotivated Child


By James Lehman, MSW

Getting into the back-to-school routine can be hard for everyone in the house. In the morning, parents are faced with groggy kids who won't get out of bed and get ready for school no matter how much you nag, bribe and scold. Homework time can be even worse, with nightly fights and accusations echoing off the walls of your home. So how can you get your child to be more motivated? The important thing to remember is this: your child is motivated—they're just motivated to resist you. Keep reading to find out how you can turn this negative motivation into a positive one.
Q: When a child becomes unmotivated and won't get out of bed, do homework or participate in activities, what is he trying to tell the parent through this behavior?
James:
When we're talking about kids not getting out of bed, not doing their homework or school assignments or not wanting to get involved in family activities, it's important for parents to realize that there is motivation in the child. But the motivation is to resist. The motivation is to do things their way, not yours, and to retain power.
When people feel powerless, they try to feel powerful by withholding. A child or teenager who feels very powerless will stay in bed, not go to school, avoid homework, sit on the couch and withhold overall involvement because it gives them a sense of being in control. To the parent, the behavior looks completely out of control. But the child sees it as the only way to have power over what's going on around him.
"You have to have the courage to let him experience the natural consequences of his behavior."
The child who uses resistance to control lacks both social skills and problem solving skills. It's important to define the difference between the two. Social skills are how to talk to other people, how to be friendly, how to feel comfortable inside your own skin and how to deal with people's kindness. Problem solving skills are the skills that help kids figure out what people want from them, how to give it, how to deal with other people's behavior, expectations and demands. Problem solving skills are needed to help a child handle being criticized in class. Many times the real reason kids don't want to do their homework is because they're simply lazy about the work or they don't want to be criticized in class and held accountable for their work.
I want to be clear about this point: everyone is motivated. The question is, motivated to do what? If a child looks like he's not motivated, you have to look at what he's accomplishing and assume that this is what he's motivated to do. So part of the solution is getting him to be motivated to do something else. To assume that the child is unmotivated is an ineffective way of looking at it. He is motivated. He's simply motivated to do nothing. In this case, doing nothing means resisting and holding back to exercise control over you.
You'll see it when you ask your child a question and he doesn't answer, but you know he heard you. What's that all about? That's a child withholding an answer to feel powerful. When he says, "I don't have to answer you if I don't want to," you see it as a lack of motivation. He sees it as a way to win control over you.
Q: As parents, we tend to respond to this unmotivated behavior by coaxing, arguing and screaming at the child. Or you just give up and do the child's tasks for him because you don't see another way. It doesn't work, but it's all you can do, it seems.
James:
Very often these kids are motivated by a power struggle. They find different ways to have that struggle with their parents. The job of the parents in this case is to find other ways for the child to solve the problem that's inherent in the power struggle. But if parents don't have those other ways, then they just get locked into the power struggle.
If you're fighting day after day with a kid who won't get out of bed, you're never going to solve that problem. Because even if he gets out of bed, then he won't brush his teeth. And even if he brushes his teeth he won't comb his hair. Or he won't wear clean clothes or he won't do his homework. If continually resisting is how a child tries to solve the problem of authority, then parents will have a hard time until they teach the child how to solve that problem appropriately.
The first step in teaching kids the problem solving skills they need is to understand how they think and realize that these kids are not helpless victims. They're simply trying to solve problems, but the way they're solving them is ineffective, inefficient and distorted. You have to deal with this distorted attempt for control in a systemic way. To give a simplistic solution like taking away his phone or taking away his TV does not deal with the problem. It won't work. You have to look at the whole comprehensive picture.
Q: So how can parents deal with this behavior more effectively, without screaming, arguing or "overdoing" for the child?
James:
I think parents should avoid giving the behavior power. When you yell at your child for lack of motivation, you're giving the resisting behavior power. I understand that parents get frustrated and yell. The point I want to make here is that it won't solve the problem. If you're yelling or arguing with this child over these issues, you're giving him more power in the struggle, and you don't want to do that. Leave the choices really clear for the child. Use "I" words. "I want you to get up out of bed and get ready for school." "I want you to do your homework now." Then leave the bedroom. If the kid doesn't do it, then there should be consequences. There should be accountability. If the kid says, "I don't care about the consequences," ignore it. Telling you he doesn't care gives him a sense of being in control and a sense of power.
I would give consequences, and I don't care if the kid doesn't like it. If you don't get out of bed, you shouldn't be doing anything else. You shouldn't get to play video games. You shouldn't spend four hours in front of the TV. If you're too sick to go to school, you shouldn't be going out of the house. Those limits should be set and followed through.
I would always tell parents in my office that you have to have the courage to let him experience the natural consequences of his behavior. It takes a lot of courage to step back and say, "Okay, you're not going to do your homework, and you're going to get the grades that reflect that." But in these cases, it can help to let the child experience the natural consequences of resistance. You don't let the kid watch TV. You say, "Homework time is from six to eight. And if you don't want do your homework in that time, that's fine. But you can't go on the computer, you can't play games and you can't watch TV. If you choose in that time period not to do your homework, that'll be your choice. And if you fail, that'll be your choice."
Along with the plan to let him experience the natural consequences of his decision, build in rewards for success, if he does make the right decision. If my son failed a test, there was no punishment. But if he passed, there was a reward. It was very simple. We rewarded A's and B's. We didn't take anything away for C; we just didn't reward it. So my son strived to have A's all the time. So with kids who resist, it's important to have a rewards system as well as a consequence system.
Remember, natural consequences are an important part of life. That's why we have speeding tickets. A speeding ticket is a natural consequence. If you go too fast, the policeman stops you and gives you a ticket. He doesn't follow you home to make sure you don't speed anymore. He lets you go. It's your job to stop and take responsibility. If you don't, you're going to get another ticket fifteen minutes later. Natural consequences help people take responsibility, and they can be used to help kids take responsibility for things like going to school, participating in class and doing homework.
So when you're interacting with a kid who appears unmotivated, remember that screaming, bargaining and doing things for him will not work. When you're looking at this child, you have to remember, he is motivated. He's just motivated to do something different than what you want him to do. He's motivated to resist you. So the more power you put into it, the stronger his resistance gets. We don't argue with kids because when we argue with them, we give them power. Focus on making that behavior powerless and give the consequences that you can give so that there's accountability.
I created The Total Transformation Program to help parents manage and change this behavior. It offers parents a comprehensive solution for changing resistance and teaching the child responsibility accountability.

Read more: empoweringparents
18 Ways to Make Your Parents Feel Great
Relationships advice - Saying Sorry
Top 10 Enticing Fruits
6 Tips for Resolving Conflicts
Story: The Power of Positive Talk
9 Tips To Make Effective Decisions
Story of appreciation
Parental Control Software - Control your kids' online activities
Work, Family, Health, Friends & Spirit - An analogy
Story of Dad and Son: Love People Use Things Not Vise-versa

Motivating the Unmotivated Child


By James Lehman, MSW

Getting into the back-to-school routine can be hard for everyone in the house. In the morning, parents are faced with groggy kids who won't get out of bed and get ready for school no matter how much you nag, bribe and scold. Homework time can be even worse, with nightly fights and accusations echoing off the walls of your home. So how can you get your child to be more motivated? The important thing to remember is this: your child is motivated—they're just motivated to resist you. Keep reading to find out how you can turn this negative motivation into a positive one.
Q: When a child becomes unmotivated and won't get out of bed, do homework or participate in activities, what is he trying to tell the parent through this behavior?
James:
When we're talking about kids not getting out of bed, not doing their homework or school assignments or not wanting to get involved in family activities, it's important for parents to realize that there is motivation in the child. But the motivation is to resist. The motivation is to do things their way, not yours, and to retain power.
When people feel powerless, they try to feel powerful by withholding. A child or teenager who feels very powerless will stay in bed, not go to school, avoid homework, sit on the couch and withhold overall involvement because it gives them a sense of being in control. To the parent, the behavior looks completely out of control. But the child sees it as the only way to have power over what's going on around him.
"You have to have the courage to let him experience the natural consequences of his behavior."
The child who uses resistance to control lacks both social skills and problem solving skills. It's important to define the difference between the two. Social skills are how to talk to other people, how to be friendly, how to feel comfortable inside your own skin and how to deal with people's kindness. Problem solving skills are the skills that help kids figure out what people want from them, how to give it, how to deal with other people's behavior, expectations and demands. Problem solving skills are needed to help a child handle being criticized in class. Many times the real reason kids don't want to do their homework is because they're simply lazy about the work or they don't want to be criticized in class and held accountable for their work.
I want to be clear about this point: everyone is motivated. The question is, motivated to do what? If a child looks like he's not motivated, you have to look at what he's accomplishing and assume that this is what he's motivated to do. So part of the solution is getting him to be motivated to do something else. To assume that the child is unmotivated is an ineffective way of looking at it. He is motivated. He's simply motivated to do nothing. In this case, doing nothing means resisting and holding back to exercise control over you.
You'll see it when you ask your child a question and he doesn't answer, but you know he heard you. What's that all about? That's a child withholding an answer to feel powerful. When he says, "I don't have to answer you if I don't want to," you see it as a lack of motivation. He sees it as a way to win control over you.
Q: As parents, we tend to respond to this unmotivated behavior by coaxing, arguing and screaming at the child. Or you just give up and do the child's tasks for him because you don't see another way. It doesn't work, but it's all you can do, it seems.
James:
Very often these kids are motivated by a power struggle. They find different ways to have that struggle with their parents. The job of the parents in this case is to find other ways for the child to solve the problem that's inherent in the power struggle. But if parents don't have those other ways, then they just get locked into the power struggle.
If you're fighting day after day with a kid who won't get out of bed, you're never going to solve that problem. Because even if he gets out of bed, then he won't brush his teeth. And even if he brushes his teeth he won't comb his hair. Or he won't wear clean clothes or he won't do his homework. If continually resisting is how a child tries to solve the problem of authority, then parents will have a hard time until they teach the child how to solve that problem appropriately.
The first step in teaching kids the problem solving skills they need is to understand how they think and realize that these kids are not helpless victims. They're simply trying to solve problems, but the way they're solving them is ineffective, inefficient and distorted. You have to deal with this distorted attempt for control in a systemic way. To give a simplistic solution like taking away his phone or taking away his TV does not deal with the problem. It won't work. You have to look at the whole comprehensive picture.
Q: So how can parents deal with this behavior more effectively, without screaming, arguing or "overdoing" for the child?
James:
I think parents should avoid giving the behavior power. When you yell at your child for lack of motivation, you're giving the resisting behavior power. I understand that parents get frustrated and yell. The point I want to make here is that it won't solve the problem. If you're yelling or arguing with this child over these issues, you're giving him more power in the struggle, and you don't want to do that. Leave the choices really clear for the child. Use "I" words. "I want you to get up out of bed and get ready for school." "I want you to do your homework now." Then leave the bedroom. If the kid doesn't do it, then there should be consequences. There should be accountability. If the kid says, "I don't care about the consequences," ignore it. Telling you he doesn't care gives him a sense of being in control and a sense of power.
I would give consequences, and I don't care if the kid doesn't like it. If you don't get out of bed, you shouldn't be doing anything else. You shouldn't get to play video games. You shouldn't spend four hours in front of the TV. If you're too sick to go to school, you shouldn't be going out of the house. Those limits should be set and followed through.
I would always tell parents in my office that you have to have the courage to let him experience the natural consequences of his behavior. It takes a lot of courage to step back and say, "Okay, you're not going to do your homework, and you're going to get the grades that reflect that." But in these cases, it can help to let the child experience the natural consequences of resistance. You don't let the kid watch TV. You say, "Homework time is from six to eight. And if you don't want do your homework in that time, that's fine. But you can't go on the computer, you can't play games and you can't watch TV. If you choose in that time period not to do your homework, that'll be your choice. And if you fail, that'll be your choice."
Along with the plan to let him experience the natural consequences of his decision, build in rewards for success, if he does make the right decision. If my son failed a test, there was no punishment. But if he passed, there was a reward. It was very simple. We rewarded A's and B's. We didn't take anything away for C; we just didn't reward it. So my son strived to have A's all the time. So with kids who resist, it's important to have a rewards system as well as a consequence system.
Remember, natural consequences are an important part of life. That's why we have speeding tickets. A speeding ticket is a natural consequence. If you go too fast, the policeman stops you and gives you a ticket. He doesn't follow you home to make sure you don't speed anymore. He lets you go. It's your job to stop and take responsibility. If you don't, you're going to get another ticket fifteen minutes later. Natural consequences help people take responsibility, and they can be used to help kids take responsibility for things like going to school, participating in class and doing homework.
So when you're interacting with a kid who appears unmotivated, remember that screaming, bargaining and doing things for him will not work. When you're looking at this child, you have to remember, he is motivated. He's just motivated to do something different than what you want him to do. He's motivated to resist you. So the more power you put into it, the stronger his resistance gets. We don't argue with kids because when we argue with them, we give them power. Focus on making that behavior powerless and give the consequences that you can give so that there's accountability.
I created The Total Transformation Program to help parents manage and change this behavior. It offers parents a comprehensive solution for changing resistance and teaching the child responsibility accountability.

Read more: empoweringparents
18 Ways to Make Your Parents Feel Great
Relationships advice - Saying Sorry
Top 10 Enticing Fruits
6 Tips for Resolving Conflicts
Story: The Power of Positive Talk
9 Tips To Make Effective Decisions
Story of appreciation
Parental Control Software - Control your kids' online activities
Work, Family, Health, Friends & Spirit - An analogy
Story of Dad and Son: Love People Use Things Not Vise-versa

What is a Lesson Learned



A lesson learned is a useful collation of management information gained through experience that we should retain for future use.  Depending on the lesson, it could be a valuable technique or an outcome that we wish to repeat or it could be an undesirable result we wish to avoid. Often, identifying our lessons learned is as simple as asking the question, “What worked well or what didn’t work so well?” Lessons learned can be categorized as:


·    something learned from experience,


·    an adverse experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence,


·    an innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or


·    the knowledge acquired from an innovation or an adverse experience that leads to a process improvement.


Why are lessons learned important?


Ultimately, lessons learned are a matter of improving the productivity and efficiency of a process. Individuals or teams can benefit from the knowledge gained through the experience of those who have gone before them. Many organizations that label themselves as “learning organizations” often overlook their own experiences as a platform for learning. They assume that their collective experiences are passed along to the next person or group. To be considered a learning organization we must be proactive, capture lessons learned, and “cross-pollinate” the concepts through training or other techniques that expose the information to others who may benefit from it. The application of lessons learned helps produce teams which operate with less risk of failure, increased efficiency, and more awareness of their surroundings.

Project Management: What is a Lesson Learned?


A lesson learned is useful project management information gained through experience that your organization should retain for future use and that can be relevant to other organizations. Depending on the lesson, it could be a valuable technique or an outcome that you wish to repeat or it could be an undesirable result you wish to avoid. Often, identifying your lessons learned is as simple as asking the question, "What worked well or what didn't work so well?" Lessons learned can be categorized as:
  • something learned from experience,
  • an adverse experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence,
  • an innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or
  • the knowledge acquired from an innovation or an adverse experience that leads to a process improvement.

Why are lessons learned important?

Ultimately, lessons learned are a matter of improving the productivity and efficiency of a process. Individuals or teams can benefit from the knowledge gained through the experience of those who have gone before them. Many organizations that label themselves as "learning organizations" often overlook their own experiences as a platform for learning. They assume that their collective experiences are passed along to the next person or group. To be considered a learning organization we must be proactive, capture lessons learned, and "cross-pollinate" the concepts through training or other techniques that expose the information to others who may benefit from it. The application of lessons learned helps produce project teams which operate with less risk of failure, increased efficiency, and more awareness of their surroundings.

What does a good lesson-learned look like?

Documenting a useful lesson-learned requires a clear understanding of the purpose and importance of documenting the successes and/or failures of a project. Because lessons learned serve as an important management tool in retaining organizational knowledge, reducing project risk, and improving project performance, they must have relevance to future projects. To build relevance into your lesson-learned and make them of value to others in addressing similar situations, you must:
  • identify the project management element in which the problem arose
  • describe how the problem arose and define the problem or positive development encountered, and
  • provide concrete, practical solutions or recommendations based on this experience.
Statements such as "Clearly defined roles and responsibilities, along with a strong focus on communication channels, are essential to project success." are not effective lessons learned. There is no context for the statement, and without context such a statement serves only as a basic Project Management best practice. While requiring more effort to develop, the examples in the appendix make the same statement, but do so in a context that defines what project management element is affected by the lesson learned, what the problem was that led to the lesson being learned, and how the lesson learned can serve future projects before a problem arises.
Source: OCIO Picture source: QuotesGram SimilarArticles: Professionalism 

Heal your Mind, Heal your Body!



When we are healthy we often take it for granted and get busy enjoying all the other things and do not care for health. However, when we are not healthy, it can over our life miserable.
In many cases disease of the body is a result of dis-ease in the mind, soul, spirit, subconscious, call it what you will. The good news is, that means we can do something about it.
Disease of the body results from dis-ease in the mindMany countries have long recognized this link and their medicinal techniques reflect a much more "holistic" approach to healing. It is a reality that our thoughts are closely linked to our physical bodies; dysfunction in one is often reflected in the other. Allopathic medicine tends to treat symptoms, often successfully "making it go away", but fail to treat the cause.

There is scientific evidence now showing that the immune system, actually works closely with both the nervous and endocrine systems to carry out its task. Clearly indicates that our mind and our emotions can influence illness.

Physical patterns are created in sympathy with mental patterns.
Our mind and our bodies are so closely linked and used to working automatically that both positive and negative internalized beliefs in the mind are reflected in other parts of the body. Physical problems are created in sympathy with mental patterns. Positive thoughts makes the body in healing, makes natural defenses to action. These actions are often subconscious and compulsive or addictive in nature.


There are many other reasons why we get sick and some of those are out of our control, but being strong and healthy mentally is our very best defense against sickness.

Actions for Positive Health
The following are essential for living healthily and healing.
  • Love and respect your whole self.
  • Forgive everyone - It is a truly powerful healing tool, it just releases you from continuing to be a victim. Anger and resentment held over a long period WILL cause serious illness.
  • Be Positive- a positive outlook improves health outcomes. Never criticise yourself or others, Replace negative thoughts with positive self-nurturing ones.
  • Start a programme of extreme self care - its time to get serious about caring for yourself at all levels, start doing the things you love, look after yourself, have some fun. Set time aside every day, just for you, use to get back in touch with your inner self.
  • Make healthy, informed, self-nurturing choices - thinking consciously, be aware of your thoughts and words. If you are stuck, it usually because there is something you need to know. Make it your goal to always actively seek and understand the knowledge you need. This will enable you to make the correct choices for you.
  • Talk to your Doctor -do not abandon your medical support just because you find an alternative approach.
  • Exercise regularly- Failure to or an inability to exercise will inevitably bring on health problems. I strongly recommend trying to adjust your lifestyle to naturally incorporate exercise as part of your normal life. The more you exercise and the more powerfully you exercise, the better you will feel and you will also experience a thrilling boost to your natural energy levels.
  • Affirmations for Health- Learn more about the positive power of affirmations and other supporting techniques
Article source: Unknown ||| Picture Source: HBMS

100 Articles on Professionalism, Management and Leadership

Begin the Leadership Journey Here
Manage The Boss
6 Keys for Success - ADVICE
Establish Effective Documentation Management System
How to Develop Analytical Skills
Use Proactive Approach to avoid mishaps
How to Build Trust to Empower Professional and personal Relations
Only Hard Work Will Guarantee My Professional Growth? No?
How to Reduce the Gap Between Potential and Performance?
10 Tips to Manage Your Emails Effectively
9 Tips to Make Effective Decisions
Leadership Vision – The Critical Personality Trait
6 Techniques to Develop Empathic Skills
Keep the Engine Running – A message for consistency
Manager Your Appearance for Strong Impression
How to Evaluate Managers
How to Overcome Fear
Stop Complaining Start Achieving
10 Analogies for a Good Leader
How Happy is Your Organization
Are you as Ambitious as Steve Jobs, Maradona and Picasso?
Sweeping Statements - Annoying, Irritating and Insulting
8 Ps of Vision and Strategy
Don’t Feed a Man a Fish ; Teach How to Catch it
New Manager’s Fundamentals – Some Critical Points
10 Things Not to Share with your Colleagues
The Secret to Deal with a Bad Boss
Becoming a Unique Entrepreneur
7 Super Qualities You Must Possess
Most Popular Interview Questions for Managers
16 Habits of Highly Creative people
Team Leader Should Be Constructive
My Boss is Taking Credit for my Work
What gives a man or woman the right to lead..?
How to Make Work Feel Effortless
Teamwork – The Essence of Work Place
3 Ways to Win Over Your New Boss
The 3 Bucket Theory for career success
5 Good Management Characteristics
Another Meeting? How to Avoid Wasting Time?
How to become unemployed in 6 Steps
What Hiring Managers Really Want from You
Moving to GM Role?
Interview Tips for Project Managers
Thinking Out of Box – 4 Simple Rules
4 Tips for Creative Thinking
12 Steps to Build Perfect Teams
Manage Team Performance by Managing Behaviour
How to Work Smart Not Hard
Time Management for daily activities
Secrets to give presentations
How to Accept and Give Professional Criticism With Grace
30 Time Management Tips For Work-Life Balance
Interview Tips: What are your Strengths and Weaknesses
8 Ways to be More Productive
12 Simple Ways to Improve Employees Productivity
13 Things You Should Never Discuss With Your Colleagues or Boss
25 Employee Engagement Ideas
How to Decline a Job Offer
Convincing Your Boss to Make You a Manager
5 Things Interviewers Should & Should Not Do
A generic checklist for a project manager
SPIN Technique for Sales Professionals
Great Ways To Kill Morale
How to Mediate a Dispute Like a World Class Diplomat
5 Ways to Increase Project Management Maturity
How to Be the Center of Attention at Work
How to Get Job References Without Asking
Breaking Bad News to Your Boss
11 Project Management Tips for Setting and Managing Expectations
Searching for Job? Ask these 7 Questions to Yourself
Project Management: 6 Steps to Manage the Schedule
8 Things Better Than IQ at Work (Infographic)
5 Ways towards Becoming Effective Project Manager
12 Points for Effective Business Communication
Interview Questions You Should Never Answer
How to Avoid Hiring a Toxic Employee
​​Management of Workplace Stress
5 Golden Rules of Goal Setting
Life is a Game of Juggling
6 Ways to Market Your Small Business for Less Than $100
The Right Way to Hold People Accountable
12 Steps to be Hired in UAE (Dubai)
Top 10 Project Management Certifications in Demand
Busy? Press The Stop Button!
Why Resumes Are Rejected? - Some Interesting Facts
How to Stop the Relationships Blame Game
Do You Have a Manager’s Mindset?
5 Steps to Develop Your Personality
Changing jobs? Consider this.
7 Ways to Add Adventure to Your Career
HBR: To Get More Creative, Become Less Productive
Making Decisions? Read These 14 Tips
101 Common-Sense Rules for Leaders
Saying Sorry to the Customer - Sample Formats
Is Your Boss Pushing You to Your Limit?
Using Zoom In and Zoom Out Tool
Employee Feedback System for Continuous Improvement
10 Steps to Ensure Continuous Improvement
How to Reduce Business Costs